Softwave Therapy for Knee or Shoulder Pain in Daniel Island, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Softwave Therapy for Knee or Shoulder Pain in Daniel Island, SC

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Struggling with Knee or Shoulder Pain that won't improve?

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Some of the most common conditions that Softwave therapy treats include:

Knee Pain

Softwave Therapy Daniel Island, SC
 Shoulder Pain Daniel Island, SC

Shoulder Pain

Softwave Therapy Daniel Island, SC

Jumper's Knee

 Shoulder Pain Daniel Island, SC

Plantar Fasciitis

Softwave Therapy Daniel Island, SC

Stress Fractures

 Shoulder Pain Daniel Island, SC

Patella Tendinopathy

Softwave Therapy Daniel Island, SC

Rotator Cuff Pain

 Shoulder Pain Daniel Island, SC

Tennis Elbow

Softwave Therapy Daniel Island, SC

Calcific Tendinopathy

Softwave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis in Daniel Island, SC

When you get up in the morning and go to the bathroom to brush your teeth, do you notice a stabbing, sharp pain near your heel? Does the pain go away once you have a chance to walk around? If so, you could have plantar fasciitis. According to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, this painful condition is quite common. About two million people suffer from plantar fasciitis every year, and almost 10% of all people will experience the condition at least once in their life.

 Shoulder Pain Daniel Island, SC
Plantar Fasciitis icon

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

This common foot issue happens when the plantar fascia - a fan-shaped tissue near your heel - gets inflamed. The plantar fascia is a thick strip of connective tissue that links your toes to your heel bone, helping to preserve the arch of your foot. When this band is strained, it causes intensely sharp pain, usually in the morning when you wake up and plant your feet on the floor.

Most folks ignore plantar fasciitis because the pain eventually goes away throughout the day. However, if left untreated, plantar fasciitis can lead to weakness and chronic pain, which may affect daily walking.

Some causes of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Playing Sports
  • Standing or Working on Feet for Long Periods of Time
  • Working or Exercising on Hard Floor Surfaces
  • Exercising Without Stretching
  • Wearing Shoes with Minimal Foot Support
  • Long Periods of Standing or Walking Barefoot

Do Traditional Treatment Options Work?

The short answer to this question is not really. Patients with plantar fasciitis will ice the affected area with little-to-no relief since they spend so much time on their feet. It's hard to rest an achy heel if you've got a job that requires you to be on your feet. Anti-inflammatory meds like Advil don't work all that well, either. They may provide temporary pain relief, but in terms of a long-term solution, taking these drugs will cause major side effects.

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Plantar Fasciitis icon

The Benefits of Shockwave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis in Daniel Island, SC

When more conservative treatment options like ice and over-the-counter meds don't work, most doctors turn to ultra-expensive orthotics, steroid injections, or invasive surgery. For the average person, those options fail on all fronts, as they carry risks for side effects and may even cause the issue to worsen.

Instead of going under the knife or changing their daily routines, many people suffering from plantar fasciitis are turning to Softwave therapy for relief.

During a shockwave therapy session, our expert providers use a special probe to deliver pressure waves to inflamed tissue. These waves trigger natural healing processes causing new blood vessels to form. In turn, oxygen is supplied to the affected area, reducing inflammation and causing healthy cells to regenerate. Shockwave therapy also produces collagen, which is crucial for connective tissue health.

With just a few visits, many patients find long-term relief from plantar fasciitis without relying on strange drugs or harmful surgeries.

Softwave Therapy for Knee Pain in Daniel Island, SC

Living with knee pain is just miserable. From knee tendonitis to osteoarthritis, knee pain can prevent you from enjoying activities and affect your day-to-day life. Your knee is a joint comprised of cartilage, bone, ligaments, and fluids. Tendons and muscles within the knee help the joint move. When one of these crucial knee structures is hurt or compromised, it results in knee pain and long-lasting knee problems. This, in turn, leads to difficulty walking at best and debilitating knee issues at worse.

Softwave Therapy Daniel Island, SC
Causes Knee Pain

What Causes Knee Pain?

If you're an active person or somebody who plays sports often, you're probably all too familiar with knee pain - especially common conditions like patellar tendinopathy. Also called "jumpers knee," this issue happens at the patellar tendon, which is found on the front of the knee just under the knee cap. When living with this condition, most patients experience pain around the kneecap or lower down on the leg around the tibia.

In addition to injuries and issues like jumper's knee, everyday wear and tear will cause knee pain over time. With time, this knee pain can develop into arthritis. If your knees are swollen, painful, or stiff, you may have arthritis in your knees. Regardless of the kind of knee pain you're experiencing, treatment options have been limited to agonizing surgeries and addicting pain medications. But that all changes with shockwave therapy for knee pain in Daniel Island, SC.

Causes Knee Pain

The Benefits of Softwave Therapy for Knee Pain

Though no two knee pain problems are exactly the same, shockwave therapy has been shown to be highly effective for knee pain. In fact, many patients at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine find relief after just one session. Many times, sessions can be completed in as little as 30 minutes. So if you want to find relief for knee pain on your lunch break, that's definitely possible.

As is the case with plantar fasciitis, Softwave therapy works by sending sound wave and low-energy impulses to the affected area of your knee. These pulses stimulate your body's healing factors, which can help regenerate and repair damaged tendons and tissues. Softwave therapy for knee pain is especially promising for people who have tried other treatments - like surgery and pain meds - with disappointing results.

Benefits include:

  • No Surgery
  • No Medications
  • Pain-Free Treatment
  • Long-Term Relief
  • Enhanced Range of Knee Motion
  • No Risks of Addiction
  • Short Treatment Sessions
  • Quick Relief

Does Shockwave Therapy for Knee Pain Really Work?

Several studies and reviews prove that Softwave therapy can be very beneficial for people suffering from knee pain problems like jumper's knee. A study involving 66 patients with knee pain found that they enjoyed a significant improvement in their reported pain levels with Softwave therapy. In fact, knee pain was reduced by nearly 50% after a single month. When combined with other regenerative and physical therapy treatments at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, your days of living with knee pain are numbered.

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Softwave Therapy for Shoulder Pain in Daniel Island, SC

Here's a fact for you to consider: Every joint that you have in your body plays a part in your day-to-day life. But when we think of joint issues, we typically jump to knee issues. However, your knees aren't the only joints in your body to go through wear and tear. Your shoulders experience just as much, if not more, wear and tear than your knees. We put a strain on our shoulders just about every time we use or move our arms. Our shoulders play a pivotal part in living a normal life. When they begin to deteriorate over time due to age or overuse, it creates a litany of painful problems.

 Shoulder Pain Daniel Island, SC
Causes Shoulder Pain

What Causes Shoulder Pain?

There are many causes of shoulder pain, like deterioration, inflammation, and trauma. Of the many painful shoulder conditions affecting Americans yearly, rotator cuff tendonitis and arthritis are very common. Also called calcific tendinitis, rotator cuff pain is caused by built-up calcium deposits on the shoulder's tendons, which connect your rotator cuff to nearby muscles and bones. This painful condition is usually linked to sports, like basketball and volleyball, or in professions requiring repetitive movements, like in the plumbing industry.

Some common symptoms of shoulder pain and rotator cuff tendinitis include:

  • Swelling
  • Weakness of the Arm
  • Limited Range of Motion
  • Shoulder Stiffness or Tenderness
  • Disturbed Sleep
  • Dull, Achy Pain

Though strengthening exercises and some medications provide temporary relief for shoulder pain, they're not meant as long-term solutions. Luckily, Softwave therapy for rotator cuff pain in Daniel Island, SC, can help.

Causes Shoulder Pain icon

How Does Shockwave Therapy Heal Shoulder Pain?

Shockwave therapy has been shown to work wonders for shoulder pain. Low-intensity shockwaves break up calcium deposits and jumpstart your body's healing processes, stimulating blood flow and healthy cell growth. Shockwave treatment is especially effective for long-term shoulder pain since it releases stem cells, sends growth factors to the affected area, and boosts capillary production. Shockwave therapy has also been shown to break down scar tissue and eliminate trigger points, all of which decrease shoulder pain. This relief is most often long-lasting, unlike other treatments like medications and injections.

Does Softwave Therapy for Shoulder Pain Really Work?

Many studies support the efficacy of Softwave therapy for shoulder conditions like rotator cuff pain and calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. In a study of 84 patients living with long-term rotator cuff tendonitis, participants in the treatment group saw a significant decrease in the intensity of their shoulder pain. Another study related to shockwave therapy for calcific tendonitis found that 86.6% of patients experienced fewer calcifications.

If you're having to live with rotator cuff pain or another type of shoulder issue, choosing Softwave therapy may be your best course of action.

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Live a Pain-Free Life with Softwave Therapy from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Whether you're sick of living with intense heel pain from plantar fasciitis, the mobility issues associated with knee pain, or the day-to-day struggles of rotator cuff degeneration, you'll find hope at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine. Unlike some medical clinics, our team of doctors and specialists focus on an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to healing. Instead of relying on addictive medications and invasive surgeries, we prefer to address the underlying causes that our patients face.

We combine several all-natural pain relief therapies so that your shoulder pain, knee pain, joint pain, and foot pain go away for good. We resolve pain by using healing treatments that restore function and improve mobility for the long term. Our state-of-the-art regenerative medicine treatments, used hand-in-hand with proven chiropractic techniques, will stimulate your body's healing power from within. If your pain is related to muscles, nerves, and bones, our doctors can help you overcome discomfort, injury, or medical conditions affecting these systems.

If you've been unable to resolve your pain or have become dependent on painkillers to cope, Softwave therapy may be the natural solution you need. It all starts with a quick call to our office, so we can begin to understand your needs. When you come for your first visit, our doctors will find the personalized treatment you need so that you can manage your pain in a non-invasive and drug-free environment manner.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

Jan. 23 official start of tax season

Tax season is upon us with Jan. 23 the first official filing day set by the Internal Revenue Service and the South Carolina Department of Revenue (SCDOR).Individuals can begin submitting their state and federal tax returns on that date, with the final deadline Tuesday, April 18, by midnight.Last year, more than 93% of returns were filed electronically, reports SCDOR, and approximately 87% of refunds were issued by direct deposit."We are pleased that so many South Carolinians have accepted online filing and direct de...

Tax season is upon us with Jan. 23 the first official filing day set by the Internal Revenue Service and the South Carolina Department of Revenue (SCDOR).

Individuals can begin submitting their state and federal tax returns on that date, with the final deadline Tuesday, April 18, by midnight.

Last year, more than 93% of returns were filed electronically, reports SCDOR, and approximately 87% of refunds were issued by direct deposit.

"We are pleased that so many South Carolinians have accepted online filing and direct deposit," said SCDOR Director Hartley Powell. “It's the safest, most accurate way to file and the fastest way to receive refunds."

Here are some tips to make your tax filing process a little less stressful.

File online. Filing online with a reputable provider is convenient, secure, and accurate. Many South Carolinians are eligible to file online for free with easy-to-use tax preparation software. Visit dor.sc.gov/iit-filing to view all of your filing options.

Make sure you have all W-2s, 1099s, and other necessary documents before you file. Year-end pay stubs may not match what your employer reports to the government, which can slow down processing.

Choose direct deposit. Direct deposit is the fastest and safest refund option. Your refund is deposited directly into your bank account, so there's no need to worry about lost or stolen checks and no waiting on delayed or returned mail. Learn more about why direct deposit is the preferred refund option at dor.sc.gov/refund.

Allow time for processing and fraud prevention. State and Federal offices will begin processing returns Feb. 6 to allow employers time to meet the Jan. 31 W-2 submission deadline.

Tax return and refund processing is expected to take 6-8 weeks from Feb. 6 or the date you file, whichever is later, to allow the SCDOR to use all available tools to check for fraud and protect your refund.

Track your refund. Check your refund status anytime using the Where's My Refund tool at dor.sc.gov/refund. You can track which of the four stages your refund is in – fraud check, accuracy review, final verification, refund approval and preparation – and the estimated timeframe for each stage. Keep in mind that if you choose a paper check refund, your processing time may be longer.

Here are some new rules for individual tax returns being file in 2023:

Military retirement pay exclusion. Because of a new law enacted, all military retirement pay is excluded from South Carolina Individual Income Tax beginning in tax year 2022. Reduce the retirement deduction and the age 65 and older deduction by the amount of military retirement deduction taken. For more information, refer to SC Revenue Ruling #22-11, available at dor.sc.gov/policy.

Rebate recipients pay no state taxes on their payment. Those who received a state tax rebate in 2022 may receive a 1099G, but they owe no state taxes on their rebate, since it is considered a refund.

An increase in the dependent exemption. The exemption amount for tax year 2022 is $4,430 and is allowed for each eligible dependent, including both qualifying children and qualifying relatives.

An increase in the Motor Fuel User Fee Credit. The refundable credit increases from 9 cents per gallon to 11 cents per gallon for tax year 2022. Full or part-year resident taxpayers may claim the refundable credit for the lesser of the increase in South Carolina Motor Fuel User Fee they paid during 2022 or the preventative maintenance costs they incurred in South Carolina during the tax year.

An increase in the Earned Income Tax Credit. Full-year residents may claim the South Carolina Earned Income Tax Credit if they are eligible for the federal credit. For tax year 2022, the non-refundable credit is equal to 104.17% of the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit allowed the taxpayer.

In order to stay informed, taxpayers can find more resources at dor.sc.gov/iit. Connect on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to stay up-to-date with the latest news, tax tips, and available resources.

Cainhoy farm seeks single-family residential zoning

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.Jan. 12: A site plan for Hawthorne at Clements Ferry Road, a 210-unit multifamily development on 11 acres at 2800 Clements Ferry Rd.A preliminary subdivision plat and road construction...

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.

Jan. 12: A site plan for Hawthorne at Clements Ferry Road, a 210-unit multifamily development on 11 acres at 2800 Clements Ferry Rd.

A preliminary subdivision plat and road construction plans for Del Webb Entrance Road, a new public road on 11 acres on Clements Ferry Road.

Jan. 4: Request a variance to allow the removal of one grand tree at 15 Surr St. on Daniel Island. Results: Pending.

Jan. 5: A site plan for Woodfield Daniel Island 3, a 163-unit multifamily development on 6 acres at 2058 Benefitfocus Way. Results: Pending final documentation to Zoning, T&T and MS4. Once approved, submit Site Plan to Zoning for stamping.

Jan. 10: An ordinance to rezone 10.32 acres at 638 Tuxbury Farm Road and two adjacent parcels on Tuxbury Farm Road in Cainhoy to single-family residential zoning. The property is owned by Ray and Angela Waits. Results: Pending.

An ordinance to rezone 5.71 acres at 715 Yaupon Drive & 2682 Highway 41 in Cainhoy to diverse residential zoning. The property is owned by Rumphs Auto Service et al. Results: Pending.

Berkeley Co. Bd. of Education meets twice each month. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

Berkeley Co. Council meets fourth Mon. of each month, 6 p.m., Berkeley County Admin. Blg., 1003 Hwy 52, Moncks Corner.

City of Charleston Council typically meets the second and fourth Tues. of each month, 5 p.m., City Hall, 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC and/or virtually via Conference Call #1-929-205-6099; Access Code: 912 096 416. Exceptions: Summer Schedule - 3rd Tues. of June, July, and August; December meetings on the 1st and 3rd Tues. Dates and locations subject to change.

City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meets every Thurs. at 9 a.m.via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Site Design meets the 1st Wed. of each month at 5 p.m. via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Zoning meets the 1st and 3rd Tues. of each month at 5:15 p.m., except for January and July when no meeting is held on the 1st Tues.

City of Charleston Design Review Board meets the 1st and 3rd Mon. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Planning Commission meets the 3rd Wed. of every month at 5 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Large projects meets the 2nd and 4th Wed. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Small projects meets the 2nd and 4th Thurs. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

All meetings are open for public comment except the City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meetings.

For more information, contacts for specific projects and on location and time of the meetings or to learn more, visit charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Beresford Creek Bridge replacement timeline shifts

There is a light at the end of the Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project with a timeline reset, as well as a timeframe of lane closures due to construction.In 2019, an inspection conducted by the South Carolina Department of Transportation yielded findings of deterioration on one of the bridge beams. The weight limit was reduced to 10 tons per vehicle with 5 tons per axle.After SCDOT’s assessment three years ago, which included an emergency installation of a steel plate for support, it was determined that it needed t...

There is a light at the end of the Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project with a timeline reset, as well as a timeframe of lane closures due to construction.

In 2019, an inspection conducted by the South Carolina Department of Transportation yielded findings of deterioration on one of the bridge beams. The weight limit was reduced to 10 tons per vehicle with 5 tons per axle.

After SCDOT’s assessment three years ago, which included an emergency installation of a steel plate for support, it was determined that it needed to be replaced within one to five years. Inspections have continued to occur monthly to ensure the bridge is safe at its current load.

As of a public meeting in November 2021, the project had been slated to get underway in the summer of 2022 and be complete by sometime in early 2023. Now, that timeline has been delayed with the project expected to begin this spring and be completed by spring of 2024.

Nothing has changed in terms of the project’s $2.5 million overall cost and engineering specs that call for a newly constructed bridge featuring two 11-foot lanes and 4-foot shoulders and an 8-foot multi-use bike/pedestrian path. Although, several updates recently developed from a meeting in December 2022 between the City of Charleston and Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson (JMT), the engineering firm hired to design the structure.

The bridge, road and hydraulic designs are complete and the application and relocation of utility lines have received approval by the City of Charleston Technical Review Committee. However, Dominion Energy is still waiting on approval of the utility relocation permits from the Army Corps of Engineers and S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control’s (SCDHEC) Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management to remove the old utility lines and relocate the new lines, according to the city’s director of public service, Tom O’Brien.

The utility line relocation must be approved before a construction contract can be procured and the demolition of the old bridge takes place. The city plans to open the bidding process and award a bid for construction during the first quarter of 2023, then begin preparatory work by spring in order to get construction underway by the summer.

Partial lane closures on the bridge are anticipated through the end of the school year. The bridge is expected to be fully shut down during the summer months, with the bulk of construction done before the fall school year starts, according to O’Brien.

The road closure timeline has decreased from eight to 10 months to three to six months.

O’Brien clarified that partial closure can mean one lane open, two lanes open or no lanes open.

“We want to minimize the closure as much as possible,” O’Brien said. “… with construction we just can’t always determine how things are going to go.”

During full closure, motorists on the St. Thomas Island Drive side of the bridge will be forced to use I-526 and take Exit 24 to get onto Daniel Island. It’s actually two-tenths of a mile shorter for commuters.

“The good news is there is another path,” O’Brien said. “It’s not like they’re going to be cut off completely.”

An announcement will be made when the construction bid is awarded. A website will be set up for the public to view updates on the bridge’s replacement progress.

Children’s authors to lead 2023 Author Series with coastal stories

Thanks to the generous support of the Daniel Island Community Fund and Bublish, Inc., the Daniel Island News Author Series returns in 2023. The series kicks off with two local children’s book authors who explore stories set by the sea. Join authors Leigh Cook andBenjamin Pogue on Jan. 25, 4 p.m. at the Daniel Island Library. The event is free. Reserve your space at: bit.ly/3Qf0UaN.“Nobi” by Leigh Cook Written by a Daniel Island School teacher and mother of two, “Nobi” is a s...

Thanks to the generous support of the Daniel Island Community Fund and Bublish, Inc., the Daniel Island News Author Series returns in 2023. The series kicks off with two local children’s book authors who explore stories set by the sea. Join authors Leigh Cook and

Benjamin Pogue on Jan. 25, 4 p.m. at the Daniel Island Library. The event is free. Reserve your space at: bit.ly/3Qf0UaN.

“Nobi” by Leigh Cook

Written by a Daniel Island School teacher and mother of two, “Nobi” is a sweet story about a young “merdog” – half-mermaid, half-dog – looking for answers and acceptance and is the perfect addition to family bookshelves, school libraries, classrooms, and discussions about embracing your differences and finding your own true path.

Nobi lives in the ocean with her seal pod and her seal parents, but she doesn’t quite seem to fit in. When she decides to take a chance and ventures onto the beach, she discovers a whole new life and has great adventures. Torn between her duty to protect the ocean and her desire to live on land, will Nobi ever find out where she truly belongs?

Cook decided to write Nobi because her daughter was going through a tough time and felt like she was not accepted by her friends. Cook believes no child should ever feel this way. Her hope is that “Nobi” helps children realize they shouldn’t hide their differences because they make us who we are and can help us find our purpose in life.

The book is illustrated by Catherina Matigina.

“A Walk Along the Sea” by Benjamin Pogue

An illustrated poem by Daniel Island resident Benjamin Pogue about love, nature and the wisdom of treasuring them, this watercolor illustrated children’s poem takes the reader on a journey along the water’s edge to discover crabs, shells and surf and how the ocean leaves behind “boneyards,” or maritime forests that are visible, left awash in the surf. The book’s nature and conservation themes encourage the reader to get outdoors, to explore and to take care of our families and the world around us.

Pogue is a retired marketing and consulting executive with a passion for the Lowcountry and for conservation.

Pogue hopes the poem will bring families together to explore the natural beauty that is found throughout the region. When his book was first released, he explained, “My message, in part, is that parents need to take their children out in the wilderness and see all the beautiful treasures we have in South Carolina… I would love for families to explore together all the undeveloped areas of our coast, so they can appreciate the true treasure of nature.”

The book is illustrated by former Daniel Island resident Johanna Hughes.

Feb. 22 – Civil War Era – Historical Fiction

The February author series event will be held at 7 p.m. in the theater at Daniel Pointe Retirement Community and will feature the award-winning historical novels “Railsplitter” by John Cribb and “Trouble the Water” by Rebecca Bruff.

SC celebrates year to remember for golf, with sights now set on what’s ahead in 2023

Temperatures that defy the calendar in the early weeks of 2023 whet the appetite for golfers to head to the course and in all likelihood provide an omen for what’s ahead for the game in South Carolina.“We would love another year just like this one,” said Biff Lathrop, executive director of the South Carolina Golf Association.Indeed, the game prospered again in 2022, and aficionados gathered to celebrate Saturday at Columbia Country Club on South Carolina Golf Day.They could look back with satisfaction a...

Temperatures that defy the calendar in the early weeks of 2023 whet the appetite for golfers to head to the course and in all likelihood provide an omen for what’s ahead for the game in South Carolina.

“We would love another year just like this one,” said Biff Lathrop, executive director of the South Carolina Golf Association.

Indeed, the game prospered again in 2022, and aficionados gathered to celebrate Saturday at Columbia Country Club on South Carolina Golf Day.

They could look back with satisfaction and ahead with great expectations.

The COVID outbreak that mostly impacted the world negatively beginning in 2020 turned out to be a catalyst for golf. The game that had experienced a downward spiral following 2008 economic woes this time profited during hard times from being an outdoor, non-contact sport.

Players rediscovered courses, and the demand for playing opportunities remains strong almost three years later.

“So many good things to appreciate,” Lathrop said in looking ahead to the Golf Day ceremonies that would include honoring the top players of 2022 and contributors to the game plus inducting three members into the S.C. Golf Hall of Fame.

They could look back on 2022 and recall with fondness the PGA Tour’s ventures into the Palmetto State with a pair of popular champions — Jordan Spieth in the RBC Heritage at Harbour Town Golf Links on Hilton Head Island and Rory McIlrory in the CJ Cup at Congaree in Ridgeland. Kevin Kisner made the U.S. Presidents Cup team for the second time, and Dustin Johnson continued his dominant ways after joining the LIV Tour.

They could remember Zach Adams’ winning the S.C. Amateur and competing in the U.S. Amateur; Sam Jackson’s forging a breakout year that included making match-play in the U.S. Mid-Amateur en route to earning the SCGA’s Player of the Year honors; or Eddie Hargett’s running away with the Senior Player of the Year title for the fourth straight year.

Moments to remember would include the smashing success of the SCGA’s inaugural Public Links Championship, an event designed for the non-club golfer, or the rollout of the S.C. Junior Golf Association’s Players Series, a developmental competition. The SCGJA team retained the Watson Cup with a victory over a team of Scottish juniors in an event played on famed courses in Scotland.

Lea Venable earned the WSCGA Player of the Year honor with a season that included qualifying for the U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur. Jayne Pardus claimed the Senior Player of the Year honors in a year that included quality performances everywhere from Florida to Arizona to Scotland in addition to the Carolinas.

Then, there’s the economic impact to celebrate. A survey conducted by the S.C. Department of Parks, Revenue and Tourism found that the state’s golf industry in 2021 had a total economic impact of $3.3 billion in output or sales, 37,959 jobs, $1.5 billion in wages and income and $370 million in federal, state and local taxes. The taxes included $18.3 million in admission tax revenue, 44% of the state admission tax collection.

Perhaps most important, the desire to play remained strong with courses often filled to capacity, and, Lathrop said, “The demand for tee times shows no signs of slowing down.”

Looking ahead:

▪ The RBC Heritage, set for April 13-16, will be one of the PGA Tour’s “designated” tournaments, offering a $20 million purse and guaranteeing that almost every player among the top 20 in the world rankings will compete at Harbour Town.

▪ Some of the state’s best courses will play host to a top tournament. The State Amateur moves to The Patriot Golf Club at Grand Harbor in Ninety Six, and the Women’s Amateur will be contested at Fripp Island. The Women’s Open returns to Cobblestone Park, and the SCGA’s Public Links will be play again at the venerable Charleston Municipal Golf Course. The SCGA Junior Champion comes back to its roots at the Country Club of Lexington.

▪ The Columbia Golf Ball, a fund-raiser for the S.C. Junior Golf Foundation, will be held at the USC Alumni Center on Thursday of Masters week.

▪ The USGA will stage a pair of national championships in the Palmetto State — the U.S. Junior at Daniel Island Club and the U.S. Amateur Four-Ball at Kiawah Island Club.

“Golf in South Carolina is in a really good place,” Lathrop said. “I’m looking forward to a bright future.”

Chip shots. The induction of new members into the S.C. Golf Hall of Fame — administrator Charlie Roundtree III and championship players Todd White and Sherri Turner — highlighted the Golf Day ceremonies. ... The state organizations wasted no time in beginning competition in the new year with the women staging a one-day event prior to its annual meeting on Thursday. Shaun McIntyre (Columbia) and Scott Sullivan (Blythewood) edged David Gibson (Lexington) and Lee Gronkiewicz (Columbia) in the Forty-Plus Series Four-Ball event at Dataw Island to open the men’s season.

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