Softwave Therapy for Knee or Shoulder Pain in Awendaw, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Softwave Therapy for Knee or Shoulder Pain in Awendaw, SC

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Struggling with Knee or Shoulder Pain that won't improve?

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Some of the most common conditions that Softwave therapy treats include:

Knee Pain

Softwave Therapy Awendaw, SC
 Shoulder Pain Awendaw, SC

Shoulder Pain

Softwave Therapy Awendaw, SC

Jumper's Knee

 Shoulder Pain Awendaw, SC

Plantar Fasciitis

Softwave Therapy Awendaw, SC

Stress Fractures

 Shoulder Pain Awendaw, SC

Patella Tendinopathy

Softwave Therapy Awendaw, SC

Rotator Cuff Pain

 Shoulder Pain Awendaw, SC

Tennis Elbow

Softwave Therapy Awendaw, SC

Calcific Tendinopathy

Softwave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis in Awendaw, SC

When you get up in the morning and go to the bathroom to brush your teeth, do you notice a stabbing, sharp pain near your heel? Does the pain go away once you have a chance to walk around? If so, you could have plantar fasciitis. According to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, this painful condition is quite common. About two million people suffer from plantar fasciitis every year, and almost 10% of all people will experience the condition at least once in their life.

 Shoulder Pain Awendaw, SC
Plantar Fasciitis icon

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

This common foot issue happens when the plantar fascia - a fan-shaped tissue near your heel - gets inflamed. The plantar fascia is a thick strip of connective tissue that links your toes to your heel bone, helping to preserve the arch of your foot. When this band is strained, it causes intensely sharp pain, usually in the morning when you wake up and plant your feet on the floor.

Most folks ignore plantar fasciitis because the pain eventually goes away throughout the day. However, if left untreated, plantar fasciitis can lead to weakness and chronic pain, which may affect daily walking.

Some causes of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Playing Sports
  • Standing or Working on Feet for Long Periods of Time
  • Working or Exercising on Hard Floor Surfaces
  • Exercising Without Stretching
  • Wearing Shoes with Minimal Foot Support
  • Long Periods of Standing or Walking Barefoot

Do Traditional Treatment Options Work?

The short answer to this question is not really. Patients with plantar fasciitis will ice the affected area with little-to-no relief since they spend so much time on their feet. It's hard to rest an achy heel if you've got a job that requires you to be on your feet. Anti-inflammatory meds like Advil don't work all that well, either. They may provide temporary pain relief, but in terms of a long-term solution, taking these drugs will cause major side effects.

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Plantar Fasciitis icon

The Benefits of Shockwave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis in Awendaw, SC

When more conservative treatment options like ice and over-the-counter meds don't work, most doctors turn to ultra-expensive orthotics, steroid injections, or invasive surgery. For the average person, those options fail on all fronts, as they carry risks for side effects and may even cause the issue to worsen.

Instead of going under the knife or changing their daily routines, many people suffering from plantar fasciitis are turning to Softwave therapy for relief.

During a shockwave therapy session, our expert providers use a special probe to deliver pressure waves to inflamed tissue. These waves trigger natural healing processes causing new blood vessels to form. In turn, oxygen is supplied to the affected area, reducing inflammation and causing healthy cells to regenerate. Shockwave therapy also produces collagen, which is crucial for connective tissue health.

With just a few visits, many patients find long-term relief from plantar fasciitis without relying on strange drugs or harmful surgeries.

Softwave Therapy for Knee Pain in Awendaw, SC

Living with knee pain is just miserable. From knee tendonitis to osteoarthritis, knee pain can prevent you from enjoying activities and affect your day-to-day life. Your knee is a joint comprised of cartilage, bone, ligaments, and fluids. Tendons and muscles within the knee help the joint move. When one of these crucial knee structures is hurt or compromised, it results in knee pain and long-lasting knee problems. This, in turn, leads to difficulty walking at best and debilitating knee issues at worse.

Softwave Therapy Awendaw, SC
Causes Knee Pain

What Causes Knee Pain?

If you're an active person or somebody who plays sports often, you're probably all too familiar with knee pain - especially common conditions like patellar tendinopathy. Also called "jumpers knee," this issue happens at the patellar tendon, which is found on the front of the knee just under the knee cap. When living with this condition, most patients experience pain around the kneecap or lower down on the leg around the tibia.

In addition to injuries and issues like jumper's knee, everyday wear and tear will cause knee pain over time. With time, this knee pain can develop into arthritis. If your knees are swollen, painful, or stiff, you may have arthritis in your knees. Regardless of the kind of knee pain you're experiencing, treatment options have been limited to agonizing surgeries and addicting pain medications. But that all changes with shockwave therapy for knee pain in Awendaw, SC.

Causes Knee Pain

The Benefits of Softwave Therapy for Knee Pain

Though no two knee pain problems are exactly the same, shockwave therapy has been shown to be highly effective for knee pain. In fact, many patients at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine find relief after just one session. Many times, sessions can be completed in as little as 30 minutes. So if you want to find relief for knee pain on your lunch break, that's definitely possible.

As is the case with plantar fasciitis, Softwave therapy works by sending sound wave and low-energy impulses to the affected area of your knee. These pulses stimulate your body's healing factors, which can help regenerate and repair damaged tendons and tissues. Softwave therapy for knee pain is especially promising for people who have tried other treatments - like surgery and pain meds - with disappointing results.

Benefits include:

  • No Surgery
  • No Medications
  • Pain-Free Treatment
  • Long-Term Relief
  • Enhanced Range of Knee Motion
  • No Risks of Addiction
  • Short Treatment Sessions
  • Quick Relief

Does Shockwave Therapy for Knee Pain Really Work?

Several studies and reviews prove that Softwave therapy can be very beneficial for people suffering from knee pain problems like jumper's knee. A study involving 66 patients with knee pain found that they enjoyed a significant improvement in their reported pain levels with Softwave therapy. In fact, knee pain was reduced by nearly 50% after a single month. When combined with other regenerative and physical therapy treatments at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, your days of living with knee pain are numbered.

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Softwave Therapy for Shoulder Pain in Awendaw, SC

Here's a fact for you to consider: Every joint that you have in your body plays a part in your day-to-day life. But when we think of joint issues, we typically jump to knee issues. However, your knees aren't the only joints in your body to go through wear and tear. Your shoulders experience just as much, if not more, wear and tear than your knees. We put a strain on our shoulders just about every time we use or move our arms. Our shoulders play a pivotal part in living a normal life. When they begin to deteriorate over time due to age or overuse, it creates a litany of painful problems.

 Shoulder Pain Awendaw, SC
Causes Shoulder Pain

What Causes Shoulder Pain?

There are many causes of shoulder pain, like deterioration, inflammation, and trauma. Of the many painful shoulder conditions affecting Americans yearly, rotator cuff tendonitis and arthritis are very common. Also called calcific tendinitis, rotator cuff pain is caused by built-up calcium deposits on the shoulder's tendons, which connect your rotator cuff to nearby muscles and bones. This painful condition is usually linked to sports, like basketball and volleyball, or in professions requiring repetitive movements, like in the plumbing industry.

Some common symptoms of shoulder pain and rotator cuff tendinitis include:

  • Swelling
  • Weakness of the Arm
  • Limited Range of Motion
  • Shoulder Stiffness or Tenderness
  • Disturbed Sleep
  • Dull, Achy Pain

Though strengthening exercises and some medications provide temporary relief for shoulder pain, they're not meant as long-term solutions. Luckily, Softwave therapy for rotator cuff pain in Awendaw, SC, can help.

Causes Shoulder Pain icon

How Does Shockwave Therapy Heal Shoulder Pain?

Shockwave therapy has been shown to work wonders for shoulder pain. Low-intensity shockwaves break up calcium deposits and jumpstart your body's healing processes, stimulating blood flow and healthy cell growth. Shockwave treatment is especially effective for long-term shoulder pain since it releases stem cells, sends growth factors to the affected area, and boosts capillary production. Shockwave therapy has also been shown to break down scar tissue and eliminate trigger points, all of which decrease shoulder pain. This relief is most often long-lasting, unlike other treatments like medications and injections.

Does Softwave Therapy for Shoulder Pain Really Work?

Many studies support the efficacy of Softwave therapy for shoulder conditions like rotator cuff pain and calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. In a study of 84 patients living with long-term rotator cuff tendonitis, participants in the treatment group saw a significant decrease in the intensity of their shoulder pain. Another study related to shockwave therapy for calcific tendonitis found that 86.6% of patients experienced fewer calcifications.

If you're having to live with rotator cuff pain or another type of shoulder issue, choosing Softwave therapy may be your best course of action.

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Live a Pain-Free Life with Softwave Therapy from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Whether you're sick of living with intense heel pain from plantar fasciitis, the mobility issues associated with knee pain, or the day-to-day struggles of rotator cuff degeneration, you'll find hope at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine. Unlike some medical clinics, our team of doctors and specialists focus on an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to healing. Instead of relying on addictive medications and invasive surgeries, we prefer to address the underlying causes that our patients face.

We combine several all-natural pain relief therapies so that your shoulder pain, knee pain, joint pain, and foot pain go away for good. We resolve pain by using healing treatments that restore function and improve mobility for the long term. Our state-of-the-art regenerative medicine treatments, used hand-in-hand with proven chiropractic techniques, will stimulate your body's healing power from within. If your pain is related to muscles, nerves, and bones, our doctors can help you overcome discomfort, injury, or medical conditions affecting these systems.

If you've been unable to resolve your pain or have become dependent on painkillers to cope, Softwave therapy may be the natural solution you need. It all starts with a quick call to our office, so we can begin to understand your needs. When you come for your first visit, our doctors will find the personalized treatment you need so that you can manage your pain in a non-invasive and drug-free environment manner.

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Latest News in Awendaw, SC

Environmental activists express concerns on septic tank pollution in coastal waterways

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCSC) - The coastal waterways are home to activities like fishing, shrimping and hold many of the Lowcountry’s famous oysters. However, a nonprofit environmental law firm and the people of Awendaw say these waterways could be in jeopardy.Charleston Waterkeeper and South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, two environmental organizations of the Lowcountry, want the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) to have more of an oversight of septic systems that are being installed by the en...

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCSC) - The coastal waterways are home to activities like fishing, shrimping and hold many of the Lowcountry’s famous oysters. However, a nonprofit environmental law firm and the people of Awendaw say these waterways could be in jeopardy.

Charleston Waterkeeper and South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, two environmental organizations of the Lowcountry, want the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) to have more of an oversight of septic systems that are being installed by the entire coastline. Because of this, they filed a complaint in November that is now moving its way through the circuit court.

“DHEC has, no one has, any idea how many septic systems exist in South Carolina because no one’s keeping track of it,” Emily Nellermoe, staff attorney at the South Carolina Environmental Law Firm and one of the lead attorneys representing the plaintiffs, said.

One of the many areas of concern is in the Town of Awendaw. Back in the spring, the town’s planning commission approved two large residential subdivisions, resulting in more than 400 septic tanks coming right next to the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.

Susan Cox lives in Awendaw and says she is passionate about saving these waterways.

“The mission statement of the Town of Awendaw says they want to maintain the rural character of the town, but there is nothing about a dense housing development that says rural,” Cox said.

Cox says her and her neighbors believe this area was improperly rezoned years ago. She says these septic tanks are going to do irreversible harm to the wildlife.

Andrew Wunderley, director of Charleston Waterkeeper, says his organization tests the water quality of areas like these.

“There’s evidence that septic tanks, especially clustered at high densities, can discharge pollution by creeks and rivers,” Wunderley said. “So, it’s a huge concern... Any of those activities that make the Lowcountry lifestyle and living here in the Lowcountry so special are put at risk.”

Nellermoe says she doesn’t know why the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is not asking these important questions.

“What are the impacts of 200 septic systems on the watershed overall?” Nellermoe said. “What are the impacts to oyster beds and shellfish harvesting? They’re not asking any of those questions and they should be and that’s a problem.”

The Department of Health and Environmental Control says they do not comment on pending litigation. However, Nellermoe says she heard from them recently and they say they do not have to use their specialized agency to review these permits and they are not breaking any laws.

“This is the largest undeveloped piece of coastline on the East coast in the United States of America and once it’s gone, it’s gone,” Cox said. “You can’t get it back.”

The Town of Awendaw has not responded for a comment. Nellermoe says the timeline on this complaint depends on court scheduling, so there is not a set date of when further action will be taken.

The filed complaint for South Carolina Coastal Conservation League and Charleston Waterkeeper v. South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is below.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

FYI: News Briefs in HVAC - January 16, 2023

For your information news briefs from a wide variety of categories within the HVAC industry. Price increases, mergers and acquisitions, award winners, and more are highlighted here each week.Allied Air Enterprises (West Columbia, S.C.) announced a price increase of up to 8% on all residential and commercial equipment, accessories, and service parts.Trane Technologies’ Residential HVAC Business (Davidson, N.C.) announced a price increase of up to 10% on select residential HVAC equipment....

For your information news briefs from a wide variety of categories within the HVAC industry. Price increases, mergers and acquisitions, award winners, and more are highlighted here each week.

Allied Air Enterprises (West Columbia, S.C.) announced a price increase of up to 8% on all residential and commercial equipment, accessories, and service parts.

Trane Technologies’ Residential HVAC Business (Davidson, N.C.) announced a price increase of up to 10% on select residential HVAC equipment.

Goettl Air Conditioning & Plumbing (Las Vegas) acquired SoCal Airflow Pros (Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif.) and 4 Seasons Heating & Cooling in (Reno, Nev.).

Air Pros USA (Davie, Fla.) acquired East Coast Mechanical (Boynton Beach, Fla.).

Wrench Group LLC (Marietta, Ga.) added Mountain Air Conditioning & Heating (Ogden, Utah) to its family of brands.

P1 Service Group (Chicago) partners with Sky Heating, AC, Plumbing & Electrical (Portland, Ore.).

Unique Indoor Comfort (Atlanta) acquired Dick Hill & Son (Richmond, Ind.), Carolina Custom Air (Awendaw, S.C.), and Rye Heating and Air Conditioning (Lincolnton, N.C.).

Right Time Group (St. Catharine’s, Ontario) acquired Dunn Heating and Air Conditioning (Waterloo, Ontario).

Strikepoint Group Holdings (Newark, Del.) acquired Air McCall Inc. (Jacksonville, Fla.).

Service Champions Group (Brea, Calif.) acquired M and M Heating, Cooling, Plumbing and Electrical (Longmont, Colo.).

Uponor North America (Apple Valley, Minn.) appointed Erica Amévo as vice president of human resources and Matt Bahr as vice president of sales.

Climate Control Group (Oklahoma City) appointed Kevin Keller as chief technology officer.

Modine Coatings (Racine, Wis.) partnered with Air Solutions Partners (Dallas, Texas).

Rheem’s Commercial water heating and HVAC divisions were recognized with GOOD DESIGN Awards for 2022.

EVAPCO (Taneytown, Md.) named CHC (Hayward, Calif.) as manufacturer’s representative.

PERC (D.C.) appointed Gavin Hale as vice president in charge of business development.

NCI (Branson, Mo.) partnered with The Energy Conservatory (Minneapolis, Minn.).

Prayers for Howie: Local volunteer rescues injured owl from busy Bluffton highway

The injured owl laid against the concrete roadside barrier, surrounded by the roar of Saturday morning traffic on Bluffton Parkway.Joshua Vermilyea, a local avian expert and longtime volunteer bird rescuer, was quick to help. After getting the call from a concerned community member, he and the injured owl — now known affectionately as “Howie” — were on the road to a veterinarian. Howie rode in a covered, blanket-filled pet carrier.Howie arrived at Awendaw’s ...

The injured owl laid against the concrete roadside barrier, surrounded by the roar of Saturday morning traffic on Bluffton Parkway.

Joshua Vermilyea, a local avian expert and longtime volunteer bird rescuer, was quick to help. After getting the call from a concerned community member, he and the injured owl — now known affectionately as “Howie” — were on the road to a veterinarian. Howie rode in a covered, blanket-filled pet carrier.

Howie arrived at Awendaw’s Avian Conservation Center, about 2 1/2 hours up the coast, where his rehabilitation treatment began. The owl was severely dehydrated and has a small hairline fracture in his right wing, which prevented him from flying. Staff believe he may have been hit by a car.

As of Tuesday, conservation center staff said Howie was refusing to eat — but Vermilyea hopes his appetite will return as his stress levels decrease.

“That little bird has gone through a lot,” he said. “It might just be the commotion that’s going on.”

Howie is a barred owl, one of the most common species in South Carolina. Found year-round in dense forests near water and swamplands, the birds’ distinct call is thought to sound like human speech: “Who cooks for you?

Veterinarians in Awendaw aren’t yet sure whether Howie needs surgery. As time passes, experts will monitor his health and flying patterns to determine when he’s ready to return to the wild.

If that happens, Vermilyea said he’ll do the honor of releasing Howie back in Bluffton, where the bird will be in familiar territory.

For Vermilyea, Howie’s story is a prime example of the tension between human life and animal ecosystems in the Lowcountry.

“You’re not going to stop human expansion, it’s never going to end,” Vermilyea said. “But we have to have a balanced ecosystem. There’s no way that any of us are ever going to survive if our ecosystem fails.”

Although the Avian Conservation Center should always be the first point of contact for injured birds, a number of skilled rehabbers are available across the Lowcountry to assist in the handling and transportation of injured animals.

Vermilyea suggests people call someone who is trained to handle wildlife and keep an eye on the injured critter until help arrives.

New Awendaw middle and high school could be partially magnet

A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled toAWENDAW, S.C. (WCSC) - A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled to take part in a specialized curriculum.Charleston County School District Board Members and the people of Mount Pleasant got to hear new details about the potential schools on Wednesday. Distri...

A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled to

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCSC) - A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled to take part in a specialized curriculum.

Charleston County School District Board Members and the people of Mount Pleasant got to hear new details about the potential schools on Wednesday. District officials told people at the meeting, held at Laing Middle School, that a lot of the plans right now are just ideas with no specific timeline.

This new middle and high school would be located on 107 acres at Highway 17 and Jenkins Hill Road. As part of this plan, district staff presented concept maps with multiple options for rezoning.

Jeff Borowy, the Chief Operating Officer for the district, says this plan will be a challenge.

“Most of the times we build a school, we just build a specific zone of attendance for that school, but in this case, we want to have a number of students to offer the right programs for those students,” Borowy said. “So, we have to look out of the box and look for something different beyond the zone.”

District staff says one of the main challenges is making sure that each school holds a maximum of 500 students. This would pull in kids from D1, the Awendaw-McClellanville area, and some from D2 in the northern Mount Pleasant area.

Staff also say they are continuing to research desirable education options for a partial magnet school to reach that target enrollment.

“It’s going to be very important to let’s build the school from up, but at the same time, let’s figure out what we’re going to be doing inside,” Thomas Colleton, D1 Constituent Board Chair, said. “The curriculum needs a lot.”

There is currently no timeline on construction for the schools because the district does not know if this magnet option will be included. The district says it is possible that the earliest we can start to see construction would be in four years.

Jonathan Mars, a parent of two children at Carolina Park Elementary, says this could be an option for his family when his kids get older.

“But it does sound like they’re going to have very specific programs at the school,” Mars said. “So, for example, if there’s a great art program and my daughter’s really into art that seems like a great option to have.”

As of now, this project is not fully funded and the district says they do not have a price estimate.

They say the next step is to charter a blue-ribbon committee in mid-October that will look at enrollment numbers and look at the best options to make this project successful.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Proposed development in Awendaw causing controversy

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCBD) -A proposed development, the White Tract Development, in Awendaw has some neighbors calling for a time-out.Pulte Homes, one of the nation’s largest homebuilders, is seeking the Town of Awendaw’s approval to build a 200+ home subdivision on approximately 148 acres. The planned location is just down the street from the intersection of Seewee and Bulls Island Roads.Some neighbors say they’re worried a large subdivision could cause future problems for the area.“If you go down Bull...

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCBD) -A proposed development, the White Tract Development, in Awendaw has some neighbors calling for a time-out.

Pulte Homes, one of the nation’s largest homebuilders, is seeking the Town of Awendaw’s approval to build a 200+ home subdivision on approximately 148 acres. The planned location is just down the street from the intersection of Seewee and Bulls Island Roads.

Some neighbors say they’re worried a large subdivision could cause future problems for the area.

“If you go down Bulls Island Road right now, it’s very peaceful and tranquil…a pretty little country scene.,” said Greg St. Pierre, an Awendaw resident. “They’re gonna exploit every bit of that.”

St. Pierre and his neighbors understand growth is inevitable, but they’re hopeful Awendaw leaders will do it in what they call “the right way.” St. Pierre says there should be proactive plans for stormwater drainage, traffic mitigation, improved roadways, and more before the neighborhood is built. Additionally, the proposed spot is close to a National Wildlife Refuge and neighbors say it could be harmful to the species that thrive there.

On top of that, he says residents weren’t informed about the possible development until very recently and are now being asked to voice their opinions in a public hearing next week.

“Basically, the people are just asking for a little bit more time to understand what’s happening here.”

“You can’t stop people from selling their land, you can’t stop development from happening. It’s gonna happen, but do the right thing and don’t cram a bunch of cookie-cutter houses on postage-stamp-sized lots,” said St. Pierre.

Another concern by St. Pierre is the town’s lack of a full-time planning director. Currently, the town only has a part-time interim planning director in-house four hours per week.

News 2 contacted the Town of Awendaw with some of the questions posed by St. Pierre. The questions and answers are below.

Q: Are you aware of the concerns of Awendaw residents about the potential White Tract development? If so, what is your response?

A: The Town is aware of the concerns about the White Tract development. The White Tract Development is being developed under the auspices of a Planned Development adopted by Town Council in 2006. The approval of that Planned Development document also raised many of the concerns the Town is hearing today. A Planned Development is utilized in order to allow the Town to allow flexibility in development that will result in improved design, character, and quality of new developments and preserve natural and scenic features of open spaces. The Town of Awendaw provides for the establishment of planned development districts as amendments to a locally adopted zoning ordinance and official zoning map. The adopted Planned Development map is the zoning district map for the property. The planned development provisions must encourage innovative site planning within planned development districts. Planned development districts may provide for variations from other ordinances and the regulations of other established zoning districts concerning use, setbacks, lot size, density, bulk, and other requirements to accommodate flexibility in the arrangement of uses for the general purpose of promoting and protecting the public health, safety, and general welfare.

Q: We are hearing concerns about infrastructure surrounding the area (roads, water drainage, etc.) should a subdivision be built in the listed area. Does the town have proactive plans to address possible future problems (deteriorating roads, a lack of turning lanes leading to traffic safety concerns, water drainage) as a result of a large neighborhood?

In collaboration with the County of Charleston, the Army Corps of Engineers, DHEC and other jurisdictions, the Town is assured that roadways, stormwater drainage and traffic concerns are addressed. The Town may request additional plans and specifications of the developer of the land should they feel that something might need to mitigated in an appropriate fashion. The applicant has submitted plans to subdivide the three parcels of approximate 148 acres in to 204 parcels.

Q: I understand the Town of Awendaw only has a part-time (4 hours per week) Planning Director. Can the town handle a development of this size?

A: This is correct. The BCDCOG is contracting with the Town to provide an experienced Planning Director on an Interim basis. The Director is on-site at Town Hall for 4 hours per week, however, the Director spends upwards of 10-16 hours per week on Awendaw business. The past Town Administrator, Bill Wallace, is also actively working part-time for the Town and has over 4 decades of urban planning experience. Between the two individuals, the Town feels we have more than adequate experience to handle this project.

“If we can’t stop the neighborhood, we’re going to try to push for more green spaces, road improvements, anything that’s gonna help in the community,” said St. Pierre.

A public hearing is set for March 21st at 6 p.m. at Awendaw Town Hall for residents to share their opinions on the proposed development. St. Pierre says many people plan to come out and voice their concerns in hopes that the application for development will be denied.

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