Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in West Ashley, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
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Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in West Ashley, SC

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Struggling with ED/Erectile Dysfunction that won't improve?

Get your first treatment for ONLY $25

Benefits of Softwave

What are the Benefits of Softwave Therapy for ED?

Unlike some more traditional treatment options, Softwave therapy gets right to the crux of the ED issue. It uses shock wave technology on a cellular level, helping to naturally heal body parts, like the penis. Some of the most common benefits of Softwave therapy include:

  • Increases Blood Supply to Penis
  • Facilitate Stronger Erections
  • Helps Men Maintain Erections
  • Stimulates and Activates Stem Cells in Your Body
  • Remodels and Repairs Tissue
  • Helps Reduce Pain

Additionally, Softwave treatments don't require much prep, don't have any sketchy side effects, don't require any numbing agents or anesthesia, and result in little-to-no recovery time. Sound too good to be true? Contact Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to learn just how effective Softwave therapy is for our patients!

Shockwave Therapy

How Does This Shockwave Therapy in West Ashley, SC Work?

Softwave therapy works by using efficient, effective shock waves that cause biological regeneration processes that heal your body using its own healing factors. It works like this: Softwaves are created via a high-energy electrical discharge in water. The voltage is discharged between the plus and minus tips of an electrode. The spark gap or arching causes an equalization of voltage between the opposing tips of the electrode, which causes a hot plasma bubble. This bubble explodes and distributes in every direction, compresses the surrounding water, and generates a pressure > 10 MPa within nanoseconds.

To sum up, Softwave therapy uses low-intensity, unfocused energy that is delivered by a reflector in parallel waves. These waves help open up the blood vessels in your penis, allowing more blood to flow. At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our team of expert physicians will develop a personalized Softwave therapy plan based on your body and needs. With the right number of treatments, you should be able to achieve and maintain firm erections as you did in your prime.

Healthcare Physical Medicine

What Can I Expect During a Softwave Therapy Session at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A Softwave therapy procedure averages 10-15 minutes but may be longer depending on treatment area and diagnosis. A gel is applied to the surface area to be treated. The applicator produces pulses as the clinician moves around the treatment area. During therapy, communication with your provider is necessary to identify treatment areas and monitor progress.

Once treatment is over, you may resume your normal day-to-day activities. In fact, most patients can have Softwave therapy while on their lunch break. You don't have to worry about recovery time, side effects, or any downtime at all.

Ideal Candidate

Who is the Ideal Candidate for Softwave Therapy?

More than 50% of men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. If you're over the age of 30, have been suffering from ED, and don't want to rely on pills or surgery, Softwave therapy may be for you. That's doubly true if you've tried traditional treatments like Viagra and even surgery but didn't get the results you hoped for. Many academic studies about shockwave therapy for ED state that this revolutionary technology is successful where PDE5 inhibitors fail.

In fact, many urologists consider Softwave therapy the most promising ED treatment on the market. The truth is, even if you're not battling ED, men can use Softwave therapy as a preventative way to keep the magic flowing in the bedroom. Some of the key reasons to choose Softwave therapy over less effective, traditional treatments include:

  • No Reliance on Pills and Drugs
  • Softwave Therapy is Backed by Extensive Medical Research and Studies
  • Softwave Therapy Has a Vast Record of Success
  • Softwave Therapy is FDA-Approved for Enhanced Sexual Wellness
  • Now Available at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Q. Has the FDA approved softwave therapy for ED in cityname, state?

A. Yes - Softwave therapy is FDA 510(k) approved for:

  • Improved Blood Supply (low blood flow is the primary cause of ED)
  • Chronic Foot Ulcers from Diabetes
  • Pain Reduction
  • Treatment in 2nd-Degree Burns

Q. Is softwave therapy painful?

A. Softwave therapy does not require surgery or any invasive form of treatment. With that said, some patients describe minimal discomfort or pain during our softwave treatments. Should this occur, your medical specialist will make necessary adjustments. Usually, patients do not have to endure any pain at all and only experience a pulse or tapping feeling on their skin.

Q. How long is a Softwave treatment session?

A. An individual session only takes five to fifteen minutes. It's typically recommended that patients have treatment once a week for three to five weeks. The length and frequency of your Softwave therapy sessions will be determined after you visit our medical clinic for a comprehensive evaluation.

Q. How long does it take for Softwave therapy to work?

A. Every patient we treat is different, and as such, will have different treatment recommendations. Often, patients notice the results of Softwave therapy after the first session. However, for the longest-lasting effects, most patients need between three and four treatments, with a week of non-treatment after every session.

Q. Can I combine Softwave therapy with other treatments from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A. It's hard to give a definitive answer to this question since every patient is different. It's important for you to have a full evaluation to determine the scope of your needs and the appropriate therapies. However, Softwave therapy often works very well with other treatments. In fact, other therapies offered at our medical clinic like massage therapy and chiropractic care can make Softwave treatment even more effective.

Remember - our team at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine is always happy to answer any questions you may have about ED or our ED treatments. Give us a call today - it would be our pleasure to get to know you better!


Contact Us For Services

The Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine Difference

Unlike some wellness clinics, our experienced providers work together to optimize treatment for men suffering from ED. We always strive to make sexual wellbeing an accessible part of your everyday lifestyle.

That's why, at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our mission is simple: to correct the root cause of your erectile dysfunction by taking a comprehensive, total body approach to healing and treatment. We want to address your ED problem without having to resort to chemical-based medications or unnecessary surgeries. Instead, we focus on all-natural, effective solutions like shockwave therapy for ED in West Ashley, SC.

By discovering what's best for each person's individual body and needs, we can help create a healthier future for those in our community through our holistic physical medicine practices. Contact our office to learn more about Softwave therapy and how we can solve the underlying causes of your unique ED situation.

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Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Birds from nearby landfill causing chaos in West Ashley neighborhood

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) – They’re in the sky, perched in trees, and on top of roofs.Birds of all types are flocking to the Grand Bees neighborhood in West Ashley. According to neighbors, they’re leaving behind a mess.“A lot of poop, a lot of debris left over in the yard. You know, it doesn’t matter how many times they clean it. It’s like ‘where’d this napkin come from, where’d this come?’” said Jamie Weiler, a Grand Bees resident.The Lennar housing develo...

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) – They’re in the sky, perched in trees, and on top of roofs.

Birds of all types are flocking to the Grand Bees neighborhood in West Ashley. According to neighbors, they’re leaving behind a mess.

“A lot of poop, a lot of debris left over in the yard. You know, it doesn’t matter how many times they clean it. It’s like ‘where’d this napkin come from, where’d this come?’” said Jamie Weiler, a Grand Bees resident.

The Lennar housing development is located right off Bees Ferry Road, next to a large Charleston County landfill.

Katie Fox moved to the neighborhood one year ago and said the birds are dropping off lots of trash when they fly in.

Wrappers, feminine products, chicken bones, and even needles are just a few of the items neighbors have seen in their yards.

“I have tons of trash in my backyard that I often use one of those trash claws to pick up because I don’t want to catch any diseases from this,” Fox said. “And then many kids can’t go out and play. Dogs are choking on bones. They had to go to the vet to get those removed from their stomach. So, it’s been pretty bad. We’re all running out of ideas.”

Fox said she’s woken up by the sound of the crows every morning. The noise doesn’t stop until the evening.

Jamie Weiler said the birds weren’t a problem when the homes were being built. Little did he know, a few months later, he would have some unexpected neighbors.

“Since there’s no construction noise there’s no hammering or anything like that. They’re not scared so they’re just hanging out, hanging out, hanging out. So, it’s gotten worse over time,” Weiler explained.

According to Charleston County officials, the landfill has been there since the 1970s.

News 2 reached out to Lennar’s Charleston office, but we have not heard back. We also made calls with county leaders in hopes of getting some answers.

Turf war between Charleston, North Charleston continues over property in West Ashley

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCIV) — Today marks a new chapter in the turf war between two cities, as the City of Charleston and the City of North Charleston will go to court to over a plot of land in West Ashley, which could shake up the landscape of the town.It all started back in 2017 when the City of North Charleston annexed the Runnymede property next to the Ashley River and Magnolia plantations. The owner of this property also owned land at the Whitfield Tract plantation and gave permission to the city to annex a one-acre property a...

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCIV) — Today marks a new chapter in the turf war between two cities, as the City of Charleston and the City of North Charleston will go to court to over a plot of land in West Ashley, which could shake up the landscape of the town.

It all started back in 2017 when the City of North Charleston annexed the Runnymede property next to the Ashley River and Magnolia plantations. The owner of this property also owned land at the Whitfield Tract plantation and gave permission to the city to annex a one-acre property adjacent to it.

With this land it would open the door for North Charleston to take control of nearly 2,500 acres of land at Whitfield Tract.

But the problem is the city’s current lines do not touch this property, which is an argument the City of Charleston will hammer in at court on Tuesday, Oct. 11.

The City of Charleston and the National Trust for Historic Annexation sued the city of North Charleston in 2018 over this dispute. In the first hearing the court ruled the City of North Charleston did not have the right to jump over Charleston for this land, however Charleston did not have “standing” to sue (which can be a big hurdle to cross in civil cases.)

On Tuesday, there’s two appeals-- one for the one-acre of land and one for the remaining 2,500 acres on Whitfield Tract.

In 2018 the City of Charleston annexed the 2,500 acre property at Whitfield tract as purely a conservation measure just a week after the City of North Charleston annexed the one acre property next to it.

In 2018 the City of Charleston annexed the 2500 acre property at Whitfield tract as purely a conservation measure just a week after the City of North Charleston annexed the one acre property next to it.

Conservation experts are worried Tuesday's decision could be a slippery slope for land acquisition in the future.

“I think that you have some catastrophic impacts that could happen across this state if cities, leapfrogging over other cities. I mean, just imagine, like, Sullivan's Island, leapfrogging over the town of Mount Pleasant to get Cainhoy Road or something," Senior Program Director for the Coastal Conservation League Jason Crowley said.

The City of North Charleston gave ABC News 4 this statement ahead of the court hearing:

The City of North Charleston prevailed at the trial court level and looks forward to moving through tomorrow’s appeal hearing stage as well.

Conservation experts also warn about the environmental impacts this decision could have. The one acre of land in question is right next to the Church Creek River Basin. The property currently acts like a sponge, stopping flooding to the basin from the Ashley River.

But if this property is developed, this could flow downstream into neighborhoods in West Ashley and only increase flooding problems in the City of Charleston.

The City of North Charleston has not confirmed any plans for the property, but certain zoning requirements could leave the door open for developments. The property falls outside the City of Charleston’s urban growth boundary, which prevents them from making any developments.

However, the City of North Charleston does not follow those rules.

While conservation experts argue for the historic nature of these plantations, they say the ecological impacts could be much worse.

“Any sort of change in hydrology change and development in this vast undeveloped area will have catastrophic effects downstream in the communities that are already dealing with some pretty major flooding,” Crowley said.

"And then you add on traffic and all the other things that everyone loves to talk about. And you will just completely destroy this area that people have fought so hard to protect over the last several decades,” Crowley continued.

The City of Charleston provided ABC News 4 with this statement ahead of the court hearing:

Fixing flooding in Church Creek is a top priority for the city of Charleston-- and to do that, we have to prevent overdevelopment of this area at the top of the drainage basin. That's our goal here, and it's why we'll be in court again on Tuesday morning

Tuesday's hearing is an appellate court hearing, which will purely focus on the legality of these annexations. But it also means if the City of Charleston loses, they could appeal all the way to the Supreme Court, which could take years to be heard.

West Ashley family says neighborhood flooding getting worse

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Several inches of rain fell on Monday across the Lowcountry leaving extensive flooding behind. That led to major problems on roadways and properties taking a toll on drivers, homeowners, and business owners.The flooding impacts were felt in the City of Charleston, North Charleston, and more.For one West Ashley family, the flooding and frustration aren’t new.“It’s constantly getting worse,” said Matt Cody, a resident of Sandcroft Drive in West Ashley.Photos an...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Several inches of rain fell on Monday across the Lowcountry leaving extensive flooding behind. That led to major problems on roadways and properties taking a toll on drivers, homeowners, and business owners.

The flooding impacts were felt in the City of Charleston, North Charleston, and more.

For one West Ashley family, the flooding and frustration aren’t new.

“It’s constantly getting worse,” said Matt Cody, a resident of Sandcroft Drive in West Ashley.

Photos and videos show major flooding on their street Monday. Matt and his wife, Kelly, say it’s a problem they have been dealing with for over three years.

“The water can’t drain so we have standing water in our backyard constantly,” said Cody. “So, we have mosquitos, flooding, and any time it rains like this, it goes into our house, our garage…”

Cody says there is also water underneath the house that isn’t able to dry out.

The City of Charleston’s Stormwater Management Division has been involved and has completed some of the work that needs to be done to fix the problem including emergency ditch clearing and maintenance, heavy excavation work such as tree stump and root removal, cleaning of the roadside system, and more.

“We had the city come out about a year ago after multiple emails,” said Cody.

There’s a reason the problem isn’t being resolved and it’s a problem that the city says is out of their hands.

“Unfortunately I think what’s still leading to a lot of the flooding is we can only take those cleaning efforts up to the edge of what’s basically called the critical area or the marsh. Once you hit the marsh area, you have to get a separate set of permits,” said Matthew Fountain, Charleston’s Stormwater Management Director.

Those are federal permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state permits from the Department of Health and Environmental Control.

Fountain says it can take years to get those permits because of a struggling permit processing system. However, the city has been working with federal and state agencies to streamline the process.

“The City of Charleston along with many other counties and cities along the entire coastal section of south Carolina have been working for probably the last five and a half years or so with the state, and the last few years with the corps, trying to come up with a more efficient permitting system to be able to address these,” said Fountain.

Over the last few years, some progress on that has been made and Fountain is hopeful that soon the permitting system will take closer to three to six months instead of two years.

He says the Cody’s neighborhood is one on the list that the city plans to hire a consultant to prepare the permit application, go through the permitting process, then, once approved, hire contractors to begin extensive and expensive work to clear out the marsh.

In the meantime, the Cody family is still frustrated by the, sometimes, lakefront property that they didn’t sign up for.

“We have to worry about cars coming through, our cars being flooded,” said Cody. With my four-month-old, if we can’t get out of our house, if emergency vehicles can’t get there, that’s a major issue.”

Fountain says across the city, several projects are underway that will significantly improve flooding.

In the City of North Charleston, major flooding was also seen on Monday. A spokesperson for the city says anytime there is heavy rainfall in a short amount of time, the drainage system can become overwhelmed but, in yesterday’s case, the water cleared out within a few hours.

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State-of-the-art dental clinic opens in MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion

A state-of-the-art dental and oral health center has become the 22nd specialty in the MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion, a sign of the site’s stunning evolution. The pavilion opened in the former Citadel Mall in late December 2019, a month before the first diagnosed case of COVID in the U.S. – not exactly ideal timing.But the pavilion has thrived despite that, seeing 64,000 patients l...

A state-of-the-art dental and oral health center has become the 22nd specialty in the MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion, a sign of the site’s stunning evolution. The pavilion opened in the former Citadel Mall in late December 2019, a month before the first diagnosed case of COVID in the U.S. – not exactly ideal timing.

But the pavilion has thrived despite that, seeing 64,000 patients last year alone. The addition of the dental clinic brings the expertise of the Medical University of South Carolina’s James. B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine to the most populous part of Charleston.

“This is such an example of farsightedness,” James B. Edwards’ widow, Ann, said at the ribbon cutting.

Charleston’s mayor, John Tecklenburg, agreed. “This is where the customer base is. And although I certainly love and encourage folks to come downtown and enjoy all the things we have there, the concept of bringing our services to the citizens of West Ashley- that’s what this overall center is all about,” he said. “I think you'll be very successful.”

The clinic has four treatment rooms, on-site imaging and a full-time dentist on site, with MUSC faculty members who specialize in dental medicine coming to see patients as well. The dean of the dental school, Sarandeep Huja, DDS, Ph.D., said the clinic will focus on patients’ needs and the needs of the collaborative services dictated by existing MUSC Health patients.

“In addition to outstanding dental care, eventually we'll have all specialties and we'll have all levels of care – faculty, residents, our students, and it's really important for our students to experiences akin to what they would in private practice.”

Paul Davis, DMD and a member of the MUSC Board of Trustees, spoke of the foresight that led to the clinic’s creation. “Today's ceremony represents a milestone that began with a vision from Dr. Huja and his team, a vision that has been shared and supported by Dr. Cole and Dr. Cawley and MUSC Health,” he said, referring to MUSC President David Cole, M.D., and MUSC Health CEO Patrick Cawley, M.D.

“This vision highlights the importance of oral health as it relates to overall health and wellbeing,” Davis said.

Cole focused on the efforts that helped make that vision a reality. “It's an honor to be able to lead so many talented and dedicated people that are working hard to make a difference in people's lives. There's just one example, you know, so those are words from the heart. Thank you for what you do.”

Board chairman James Lemon, DMD, was also on hand for the ribbon cutting ceremony, as were Gene Hong, M.D., chief physician executive for MUSC Health and Lisa Saladin, PT, Ph.D., executive vice president of Academic Affairs and provost.

Huja said that while the West Ashley dental clinic is the first one not on MUSC’s downtown campus, and this growth will continue. And it will serve as a symbol of what’s possible for patients. “Why is this clinic important? The connection between systemic and oral health is epitomized in this integrated model of care, which MUSC will offer here at West Ashley Medical Pavilion.”

Ann Edwards said the clinic brings a much-needed option of dental expertise backed by an academic medical center to people who live in West Ashley. “It’s just wonderful that you have come to them. And that is so important. Thank you, each and every one who made it possible.”

To make an appointment at the MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion’s dental clinic, call 843-876-9267.

New brunch, pizza spots move into West Ashley

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- Two new dining options are moving into the West Ashley area, including a brunch spot and a New York pizzeria.‘Breakfast is a meal, brunch is a lifestyle.’That is the motto for Ruby Sunshine, a New Orleans-based brunch eatery that opened the doors of its second Charleston-area location on Friday.Ruby Slipper Restaurant Group has taken over a space in The Victory at 835 Savannah Highway in West Ashley, joining the other location at 171 E Bay Street in downtown Charleston.The spot...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- Two new dining options are moving into the West Ashley area, including a brunch spot and a New York pizzeria.

‘Breakfast is a meal, brunch is a lifestyle.’

That is the motto for Ruby Sunshine, a New Orleans-based brunch eatery that opened the doors of its second Charleston-area location on Friday.

Ruby Slipper Restaurant Group has taken over a space in The Victory at 835 Savannah Highway in West Ashley, joining the other location at 171 E Bay Street in downtown Charleston.

The spot will offer a Big Easy-inspired take on traditional Southern brunch fare including eggs benedict, shrimp and grits, omelets, and award-winning cocktails.

“We love the city and we fell in love with it the first time we came to see it,” Founder Jennifer Weishaupt said. “There’s such a great connection between Charleston and New Orleans and it has so many similar, parallel vibes in terms of the people, the architecture, and the history so that part of it is really fun.”

Ruby Sunshine in Avondale will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on weekdays and 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends.

You might have seen this food truck roaming the streets from Moncks Corner to Mount Pleasant serving up New York-style slices, but now it’s putting down roots at a permanent location in West Ashley.

Pizza A Modo Mio is moving into the old Ladles location at 3125 Bees Ferry Road in January.

The spot will offer fifteen different styles of 18-inch pizza pies served by the slice, garlic knots, chicken rolls, subs, and other selections you would expect to find at a traditional Long Island pizzeria.

Owner Michael Pitera ships all the dough in from New York and each week makes the homemade sauce and fresh mozzarella that tops the pies.

“Being from West Ashley and having the store in West Ashley, I can really bring that New York flavor to Charleston,” Pitera said. “I wanted to bring that style to my own neighborhood.”

As a bonus, Pizza A Modo Mio will double as an Italian ice shop, offering 16 different flavors of the popular dessert.

A grand opening is planned for Jan. 10, 2023, according to Pitera. Hours will be Tuesday-Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday-Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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