Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in McClellanville, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in McClellanville, SC

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Struggling with ED/Erectile Dysfunction that won't improve?

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Benefits of Softwave

What are the Benefits of Softwave Therapy for ED?

Unlike some more traditional treatment options, Softwave therapy gets right to the crux of the ED issue. It uses shock wave technology on a cellular level, helping to naturally heal body parts, like the penis. Some of the most common benefits of Softwave therapy include:

  • Increases Blood Supply to Penis
  • Facilitate Stronger Erections
  • Helps Men Maintain Erections
  • Stimulates and Activates Stem Cells in Your Body
  • Remodels and Repairs Tissue
  • Helps Reduce Pain

Additionally, Softwave treatments don't require much prep, don't have any sketchy side effects, don't require any numbing agents or anesthesia, and result in little-to-no recovery time. Sound too good to be true? Contact Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to learn just how effective Softwave therapy is for our patients!

Shockwave Therapy

How Does This Shockwave Therapy in McClellanville, SC Work?

Softwave therapy works by using efficient, effective shock waves that cause biological regeneration processes that heal your body using its own healing factors. It works like this: Softwaves are created via a high-energy electrical discharge in water. The voltage is discharged between the plus and minus tips of an electrode. The spark gap or arching causes an equalization of voltage between the opposing tips of the electrode, which causes a hot plasma bubble. This bubble explodes and distributes in every direction, compresses the surrounding water, and generates a pressure > 10 MPa within nanoseconds.

To sum up, Softwave therapy uses low-intensity, unfocused energy that is delivered by a reflector in parallel waves. These waves help open up the blood vessels in your penis, allowing more blood to flow. At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our team of expert physicians will develop a personalized Softwave therapy plan based on your body and needs. With the right number of treatments, you should be able to achieve and maintain firm erections as you did in your prime.

Healthcare Physical Medicine

What Can I Expect During a Softwave Therapy Session at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A Softwave therapy procedure averages 10-15 minutes but may be longer depending on treatment area and diagnosis. A gel is applied to the surface area to be treated. The applicator produces pulses as the clinician moves around the treatment area. During therapy, communication with your provider is necessary to identify treatment areas and monitor progress.

Once treatment is over, you may resume your normal day-to-day activities. In fact, most patients can have Softwave therapy while on their lunch break. You don't have to worry about recovery time, side effects, or any downtime at all.

Ideal Candidate

Who is the Ideal Candidate for Softwave Therapy?

More than 50% of men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. If you're over the age of 30, have been suffering from ED, and don't want to rely on pills or surgery, Softwave therapy may be for you. That's doubly true if you've tried traditional treatments like Viagra and even surgery but didn't get the results you hoped for. Many academic studies about shockwave therapy for ED state that this revolutionary technology is successful where PDE5 inhibitors fail.

In fact, many urologists consider Softwave therapy the most promising ED treatment on the market. The truth is, even if you're not battling ED, men can use Softwave therapy as a preventative way to keep the magic flowing in the bedroom. Some of the key reasons to choose Softwave therapy over less effective, traditional treatments include:

  • No Reliance on Pills and Drugs
  • Softwave Therapy is Backed by Extensive Medical Research and Studies
  • Softwave Therapy Has a Vast Record of Success
  • Softwave Therapy is FDA-Approved for Enhanced Sexual Wellness
  • Now Available at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Q. Has the FDA approved softwave therapy for ED in cityname, state?

A. Yes - Softwave therapy is FDA 510(k) approved for:

  • Improved Blood Supply (low blood flow is the primary cause of ED)
  • Chronic Foot Ulcers from Diabetes
  • Pain Reduction
  • Treatment in 2nd-Degree Burns

Q. Is softwave therapy painful?

A. Softwave therapy does not require surgery or any invasive form of treatment. With that said, some patients describe minimal discomfort or pain during our softwave treatments. Should this occur, your medical specialist will make necessary adjustments. Usually, patients do not have to endure any pain at all and only experience a pulse or tapping feeling on their skin.

Q. How long is a Softwave treatment session?

A. An individual session only takes five to fifteen minutes. It's typically recommended that patients have treatment once a week for three to five weeks. The length and frequency of your Softwave therapy sessions will be determined after you visit our medical clinic for a comprehensive evaluation.

Q. How long does it take for Softwave therapy to work?

A. Every patient we treat is different, and as such, will have different treatment recommendations. Often, patients notice the results of Softwave therapy after the first session. However, for the longest-lasting effects, most patients need between three and four treatments, with a week of non-treatment after every session.

Q. Can I combine Softwave therapy with other treatments from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A. It's hard to give a definitive answer to this question since every patient is different. It's important for you to have a full evaluation to determine the scope of your needs and the appropriate therapies. However, Softwave therapy often works very well with other treatments. In fact, other therapies offered at our medical clinic like massage therapy and chiropractic care can make Softwave treatment even more effective.

Remember - our team at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine is always happy to answer any questions you may have about ED or our ED treatments. Give us a call today - it would be our pleasure to get to know you better!


Contact Us For Services

The Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine Difference

Unlike some wellness clinics, our experienced providers work together to optimize treatment for men suffering from ED. We always strive to make sexual wellbeing an accessible part of your everyday lifestyle.

That's why, at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our mission is simple: to correct the root cause of your erectile dysfunction by taking a comprehensive, total body approach to healing and treatment. We want to address your ED problem without having to resort to chemical-based medications or unnecessary surgeries. Instead, we focus on all-natural, effective solutions like shockwave therapy for ED in McClellanville, SC.

By discovering what's best for each person's individual body and needs, we can help create a healthier future for those in our community through our holistic physical medicine practices. Contact our office to learn more about Softwave therapy and how we can solve the underlying causes of your unique ED situation.

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Latest News in McClellanville, SC

McClellanville, South Carolina

McClellanville is a fishing town in South Carolina that has traditionally relied on the sea and coastal marshes for fishing, shrimping, and oystering, which make up a significant percentage of the town's economy. The McClellan family was one of the earliest families to settle here, and the area was originally where local planters went to enjoy the milder seaside breezes. The town has gained notoriety more recently as the site of Hurrica...

McClellanville is a fishing town in South Carolina that has traditionally relied on the sea and coastal marshes for fishing, shrimping, and oystering, which make up a significant percentage of the town's economy. The McClellan family was one of the earliest families to settle here, and the area was originally where local planters went to enjoy the milder seaside breezes. The town has gained notoriety more recently as the site of Hurricane Hugo's 1989 landfall. Hugo, which pounded the South Carolina coastline at the time, was the most damaging storm ever to strike the United States. Even though McClellanville suffered some setbacks in 1989, it has significantly recovered over the past 20 years. Residents of McClellanville enjoy a peaceful, rural lifestyle on the banks of Jeremy Creek.

Geography And Climate Of McClellanville

McClellanville is a fishing town situated in Charleston County in the US State of South Carolina. It is located halfway between Charleston and Myrtle Beach and is just 11 miles east of Awendaw on Highway 17. McClellanville is placed within the Francis Marion National Forest, where a wide area of marshes separates the town from the Atlantic Ocean. Mount Pleasant and Charleston are 30 miles and 40 miles southwest of McClellanville, respectively. Right in the middle of town passes Jeremy Creek, and the town extends south to the Intracoastal Waterway, adjacent to Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. McClellanville covers a total area of 6.11 sq. km, of which 5.80 sq. km is occupied by land, and 0.31 sq. km is covered by water.

According to the Köppen climate classification, McClellanville experiences a humid subtropical climate, with hot, humid summers and extremely cold, snowy, and windy winters. The average yearly temperature is 17.9°C, with July and January recording the highest (27.1°C) and lowest (8.2°C) average temperatures, respectively. On average, McClellanville gets 1351.3mm of precipitation each year, with August reporting the highest number (182.9mm). The snowy period occurs between December and February, with the rainy season lasting the entire year.

History Of McClellanville

The history of McClellanville dates back to around five years before the Civil War when local plantation owners A. J. McClellan and R. T. Morrison started selling off waterfront lots along Jeremy Creek. To the west and south, wealthy plantation owners purchased the property to construct summer homes. The settlement was unnamed for some time. Finally, it was decided that McClellanville be the name of the town in honor of the earliest settlers, the McClellan family. Over time, the community was recognized for cultivating a wide range of food, manufacturing turpentine and tar, harvesting lumber, distilling salt during the Civil War, and, more recently, harvesting its renowned Bulls Bay oysters, clams, and shrimp. The islands, bays, and marshes that makeup McClellanville's shoreline were protected in the late 1930s by the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge. The Francis Marion National Forest was created to manage the nearby forests.

The Population And Economy Of McClellanville

According to the latest US Census, McClellanville has a population of 605 inhabitants with a median age of 42.3. The city's racial makeup is 560 white (non-Hispanic/Latino), 20 African-American or Black, and 6 Hispanic or Latino. The remaining are distributed among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), and some other races. English is spoken by 98.1% of the population. The rest speak Spanish (1.6%) and other foreign languages (0.3%). All of the population in McClellanville are naturalized US citizens. Veterans make up 15.7% of McClellanville's population, of which all are males.

Over the past years, the employment market in McClellanville has grown by 0.7%. The projected rate of job growth over the next ten years is 36.9%, which is greater than the 33.5% US average. The annual median income in McClellanville is $33,313. On the other hand, McClellanville residents' median annual household income is $75,781.

Attractions In McClellanville

Visitors may explore 259,000 acres of magnificent pine forests, bogs, and marshes in four wilderness zones. This preserve houses various fauna, including the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker. Besides wildlife watching, the forest also offers several recreational opportunities, including camping, boating, and several trails which can be used for hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, off-road motorcycling, etc.

This Colonial-era rice plantation has a magnificent Georgian-style home that was constructed between 1730 and 1750 with the proceeds of "Carolina Gold" rice that African slaves grew and gathered. There are guided tours available between 12 pm and 2 pm.

Through educational displays and innovative activities presented at the center throughout the year, one can learn more about the ecosystems of Cape Romain and the distinctive natural history of McClellanville. Check out the viewing area if you want to see the six endangered red wolves that dwell there.

McClellanville has endured countless hurricanes, yet it has managed to keep its beauty and quaintness. Today, it is a self-sufficient community with schools, old churches, lovely residences, a few stores, and docking facilities that speaks about an economy that is now mostly reliant on the sea rather than the land.

CCSD considering magnet program for future high school in McClellanville area

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Plans are finally in motion to replace the old Lincoln High School with a brand new school in McClellanville.It's been nearly a decade since Lincoln High closed. At a board meeting Wednesday night, there was finally talk of what a new school would bring the community.Charleston County School District leaders presented a slideshow detailing the future of the new high school and middle school in northern Charleston County.Since the closure of Lincoln High School, kids are waking up earlier t...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Plans are finally in motion to replace the old Lincoln High School with a brand new school in McClellanville.

It's been nearly a decade since Lincoln High closed. At a board meeting Wednesday night, there was finally talk of what a new school would bring the community.

Charleston County School District leaders presented a slideshow detailing the future of the new high school and middle school in northern Charleston County.

Since the closure of Lincoln High School, kids are waking up earlier to make the bell at Wando High and returning home late because of the long drive.

The constituent school board said a new school will bring relief to the people living in Awendaw and it will provide help to the schools already reaching capacity.

The district is looking at attendance lines within the area while looking at creating a magnet program.

"I do believe a partial magnet or magnet program of some kind might be within the programming options and given that it's going to have a size of 1,000 students it will probably need to pull in some areas other than just the McClellanville and Awendaw area," said Pamela Jouan-Goldman, Chair of the District 2 Constituent School Board.

Scenarios of possible zoning were shown during the meeting.

The methodology was based off the fiscal year 2022 data.

Parents voiced their concerns of drawing the line further down into Mount Pleasant.

"You do not want to force a family who is living right next door to a school go up the road to another school if at all possible so that's why were looking at the magnet as an opportunity to attract families that want to go there despite any increase in distance then they would have," Chief Operating Officer of CCSD Jeff Borowy said.

The district's goal is to get 500 students in both the middle and high school.

Thomas Colleton, Chair of the District 1 Constituent Board, said the school will need to offer something enticing.

“It is important to this build the school but at the same time let's figure out what were going to be doing inside. The curriculum means a lot," Colleton said.

“I don't know how much it would make sense to drive by Wando High School to get on (Highway) 17 to go up to Awendaw, but it does sound like they are going to have different specific programs at their school. So for example if they have got a great art program and my daughter is really into art, that sounds like a nice option to have," said Jonathan Mars, a parent of students at Carolina Park.

Colleton said it's crucial everyone is transparent throughout this process.

Their next steps will be to develop a blue-ribbon committee to review these options and create a draft to be presented to the constituent boards in October.

"I'm hopeful this blue ribbon commission will ease some of this tension, and let people know going to another school, which would be a state of the art school, why wouldn't you want your child to go there," Colleton said.

The Kaiser Farm Tract property was leased in December of 2021 to the former owner to be used as a hay farm.

The three-year lease agreement is able to be terminated at any time with a 90-day notice.

It's also possible a park and library could be built on the property in the future.

South Carolina Hurricane Ian threat: Your questions. Answered.

Visit the FOX Weather Wire for live updates on Ian. Click here for the latest forecast, power outages and more.Hurricane Ian made its final landfall Friday in South Carolina as a Category 1 storm....

Visit the FOX Weather Wire for live updates on Ian. Click here for the latest forecast, power outages and more.

Hurricane Ian made its final landfall Friday in South Carolina as a Category 1 storm. The storm has produced damaging winds for the Carolinas and significant flooding in coastal and low-lying areas.

HURRICANE IAN TRACKER: PROJECTED PATH, WATCHES AND WARNINGS, STORM SURGE, WINDS, RAINFALL TOTALS AND MORE

Here are questions that were being asked ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Ian:

What was the last hurricane to hit South Carolina?

The Palmetto State sees tropical weather impacts nearly every season but the last hurricane to make a direct landfall was Hurricane Matthew. Matthew made landfall as a Category 1 storm on October 8, 2016, near McClellanville, South Carolina. Surge impacts were greater than a minimal hurricane because the storm was in the process of weakening from a Category 3.

While Matthew only scraped the South Carolina coast, it brought heavy rains to the region and was responsible for 25 deaths, according to the National Hurricane Center. Damage from the storm was estimated at $10.3 billion.

How does Hurricane Ian compare to Tropical Storm Colin earlier in summer?

Tropical Storm Colin was about as weak as you will ever see a named storm. Sustained winds briefly reached 40 mph, but its rainfall was more impressive. Despite being a weak tropical cyclone, Colin produced more than half a foot of rain that quickly flooded some streets in downtown Charleston.

Hurricane Ian was much stronger at landfall. The NHC said winds were near 85 mph when it came ashore near Georgetown, South Carolina just after 2 p.m. Friday. A storm surge of between 4 and 7 feet was forecast, as well as 6-12 inches of rainfall.

Tracking Ian(FOX Weather)

How often do hurricanes regain their strength after landfalling in Florida?

This process happens more often than one might think. If a storm does not lollygag over land and makes it back over the warm water, the system can restrengthen. An example of a storm landfalling on Florida’s West Coast and restrengthening over the Atlantic was Hurricane Wilma in 2005. It made landfall along Florida’s Gulf Coast as a Category 3, weakened to a Category 2 and restrengthened to a Category 3 over the Atlantic.

Storms that struck Florida on the East Coast and restrengthened in the Gulf of Mexico include Andrew in 1992 and Katrina in 2005.

How often do hurricanes make several landfalls?

Depending on a hurricane’s track, it can make landfall in several states or countries.

Due to the frictional forces in play and the lack of warm water, land tends to weaken a cyclone, but it can quickly ramp up again once over water if its core is not interrupted.

What’s the highest storm surge Charleston and nearby Savannah have seen?

Charleston’s highest storm surge occurred in 1989 with the landfall of Hurricane Hugo.

A tide gauge in the harbor reported a water level of 12.52 feet. The National Weather Service says when the gauge reaches 8 feet, widespread flooding occurs in downtown Charleston with numerous roads flooded and impassable.

CHARLESTON BREWERY CREATES BEER TO HELP PEOPLE PREPARE FOR HURRICANES

The NWS expects the gauge to reach a level of 8.7 feet around the time of Ian’s landfall, which will cause significant issues for Charleston and the Low Country.

In Georgia, Savannah’s highest crest happened during Hurricane Matthew of 2016. The tidal gauge reached 12.56 feet during the storm.

The NWS said they don’t expect water levels from Ian to reach Matthew-like levels, but they could be significant. The NWS is forecasting a water height of 10.7 feet along the mouth of the Savannah River.

At 10.5 feet, major coastal flooding occurs. Flooding will likely cause the closure of local roadways, and several coastal communities will be temporarily cut off from the mainland. On Tybee Island, a level over 10 feet has previously led to widespread flooding, with several properties impacted.

Everyone is talking about Charleston and Savannah; what about impacts from Ian in inland areas of the Carolinas?

The FOX Forecast Center anticipates Ian will pick up forward speed, which will bring rain and wind impacts well inland.

Forecasters are concerned that heavy rainfall will lead to flooding hundreds of miles inland.

Forecast models show inland areas of the Carolinas could get up to 6 inches of rain, which could lead to flash flooding.

Charleston, Columbia, Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Raleigh-Durham and Roanoke are all high-risk zones for flooding from Ian through the weekend.

Expected Rainfall(FOX Weather)

Everywhere you go in Charleston there are signs and plaques dedicated to Hurricane Hugo. Why was Hurricane Hugo so impactful?

Let's be clear, Hurricane Ian is no Hurricane Hugo, but it doesn’t take a strong storm to deliver deadly impacts.

Hurricane Hugo holds the record for being the worst natural disaster to strike South Carolina.

The Category 4 storm had maximum winds of 135-140 mph when it made landfall on Sept. 22, 1989.

Due to the storm's organization, hurricane-force winds occurred hundreds of miles inland.

The storm’s $11 billion in damage would equate to more than $26 billion in today’s dollars.

HOW ARE HURRICANES RATED? THE SAFFIR-SIMPSON HURRICANE WIND SCALE EXPLAINED

What is next with the rest of this hurricane season?

The hurricane season is far from over, and there are still two full months left. October is usually the third-busiest month of the season for tropical development.

The Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the western Atlantic Ocean are the areas most likely to see tropical cyclone formation.

Early indications from forecast models show a continued busy pattern into October.

The FOX Forecast Center said there are no immediate threats on the horizon, but forecasters are monitoring a tropical disturbance in the eastern Atlantic that has a medium chance to develop during the next several days.

Tracking the tropics(FOX Weather)

Lowcounty Land Trust acquires McClellanville property holding iconic Deerhead Oak

MCCLELLANVILLE — A centuries-old oak tree spanning about 30 feet in circumference at its trunk has become an iconic landmark in McClellanville.Plans are underway to place the property under a conservation easement so the town can own it.The Lowcountry Land Trust acquired the single-acre parcel this fall that holds the Deerhead Oak. Its base sits at the intersection of Pinckney and Oak streets.Funds from the Charleston County Greenbelt Program and the landowner made the arrangement possible.Named for an image...

MCCLELLANVILLE — A centuries-old oak tree spanning about 30 feet in circumference at its trunk has become an iconic landmark in McClellanville.

Plans are underway to place the property under a conservation easement so the town can own it.

The Lowcountry Land Trust acquired the single-acre parcel this fall that holds the Deerhead Oak. Its base sits at the intersection of Pinckney and Oak streets.

Funds from the Charleston County Greenbelt Program and the landowner made the arrangement possible.

Named for an image formed by its branches, this special tree is the subject of artwork, murals and poetry in McClellanville, a news release said. The massive Deerhead Oak is bigger-bellied than the Angel Oak on Johns Island and taller too.

William Peter Beckman, a Confederate soldier who was stationed in McClellanville, opened a store in the tree’s shade at the close of the Civil War, according to reports. The town grew from his door.

The Deerhead Oak never stopped growing, either.

McClellanville Mayor Rutledge B. Leland III said the land has been passed down by members of the Beckman family since they opened the the town’s first store.

The Martin family in McClellanville has owned the property since the 1870s and has welcomed generations of residents and visitors to the tree.

“We are grateful for their (Beckman/Martin family) stewardship of the land and are honored to continue to preserve the park for generations to come,” Leland said in a news release.

In 2007, the Deerhead was named Heritage Tree of the Year by the S.C. Urban and Community Forestry Council for its cultural significance.

East Cooper Land Trust, now merged with Lowcountry Land Trust, started the work with the Martins years ago to conserve the Deerhead Oak property. Its former board chair, Justin Craig, recognizes the land as an area that brings people together and “defines our sense of place.”

“Land holds stories and connects people,” said Lowcountry Land Trust president and CEO Ashley Demosthenes. “Nowhere does that hold truer than a place like the Deer Head Oak.”

The land trust expects to transfer ownership of the property to the town in early 2023.

PORT HURON, Mich. — The state of Michigan is accusing a former paper mill owner from South Carolina of sending contaminated waste to a composting site for decades.

The lawsuit seeks payments from Fort Mill-based Domtar Industries for identifying the contamination, near Port Huron, and to restore areas affected by PFAS, an abbreviation for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, which are known as “forever chemicals.”

“Michigan residents should not be left holding the bag for the impacts of corporate PFAS contamination, nor for the costs of cleaning it up,” Attorney General Dana Nessel said.

Domtar, which is owned by a Canadian company, said it doesn’t comment on lawsuits.

The company formerly operated a paper mill in Port Huron and sent waste to a company-controlled composting site in Port Huron Township, the lawsuit alleged.

The lawsuit, filed Dec. 16, accuses Domtar of knowing that the waste was contaminated, despite telling regulators that it was inert.

“Even if Domtar did not know prior to 1998 that its paper sludge contained PFAS and that PFAS are toxic, Domtar acquired this information thereafter during the 22-year period from 1998 to 2020,” according to the lawsuit.

The state said it learned about the contamination in 2019.

“PFAS released by defendant have migrated into the environment, including, but not limited to, groundwater, surface waters, soils and sediments at and surrounding the Techni-Comp Site,” the lawsuit alleged.

The compounds are called “forever chemicals” because they don’t break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time. They have been linked to a variety of health problems, including cancer, liver damage and decreased fertility.

The manufacturers of the widely used substances are facing thousands of lawsuits over groundwater contamination and personal injury claims. Many of the cases were consolidated and transferred to federal court in downtown Charleston. The first jury trial is scheduled for June.

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The Post and Courier contributed to this report.

Group proposes turning former Lincoln High School into Gullah Geechee community center

MCCLELLANVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) – The Charleston County School Board’s Committee of the Whole on Monday heard details of a proposal to breathe new life into a shuttered school.Lincoln High School in McClellanville was closed in 2016. Since then, it has been available to the community in limited ways.Graduate Lewis Porchet’s vision is to transform the building into a cultural center and community hub with a number of uses to fit the area’s unique needs.“Lincoln… presented the opportunity t...

MCCLELLANVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) – The Charleston County School Board’s Committee of the Whole on Monday heard details of a proposal to breathe new life into a shuttered school.

Lincoln High School in McClellanville was closed in 2016. Since then, it has been available to the community in limited ways.

Graduate Lewis Porchet’s vision is to transform the building into a cultural center and community hub with a number of uses to fit the area’s unique needs.

“Lincoln… presented the opportunity to create a model that can not only celebrate our Gullah Geechee cultural heritage, preserve it to enrich the culture, provide a space for local artists and continuing education programs, all of that is in the plan, but also will be a model that can be duplicated along the corridor and assist in rural community development,” he told the committee Monday afternoon.

The proposal would also see the former school become a hub for rural community development, with space for entrepreneurial training, continuing education and medical resources.

“Most of these initiatives have the goal of cultural appreciation, community education or creation of new jobs,” Porchet said.

The group plans to cover its costs through grants, private funds and revenue from leasing, and asked the district to consider leasing it the building for $1 and eventually sell it to them.

A number of community members said the biggest need in the area is a space for kids.

“There’s lots of possibilities. Open up the community center, game center for the kids, something for them to do here, especially in the summertime,” Sherry Howard, who lives behind the former school, said.

Regardless of its final form, Porchet said the project also serves as a chance to build trust between the Gullah Geechee community and the school district, which haven’t always seen eye to eye.

“The Gullah Geechee community has a skewed or negative perception of the way that it’s been served, and we believe that happened for a variety of that we’re not here to even argue, we’re here with solutions,” he said.

Monday’s presentation was just for informational purposes so the board was not able to take any action, but they asked staff to review the proposal and report back by next month.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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