Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Pawley’s Island, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Pawley's Island, SC

softwave device

Struggling with ED/Erectile Dysfunction that won't improve?

Get your first treatment for ONLY $49

Benefits of Softwave

What are the Benefits of Softwave Therapy for ED?

Unlike some more traditional treatment options, Softwave therapy gets right to the crux of the ED issue. It uses shock wave technology on a cellular level, helping to naturally heal body parts, like the penis. Some of the most common benefits of Softwave therapy include:

  • Increases Blood Supply to Penis
  • Facilitate Stronger Erections
  • Helps Men Maintain Erections
  • Stimulates and Activates Stem Cells in Your Body
  • Remodels and Repairs Tissue
  • Helps Reduce Pain

Additionally, Softwave treatments don't require much prep, don't have any sketchy side effects, don't require any numbing agents or anesthesia, and result in little-to-no recovery time. Sound too good to be true? Contact Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to learn just how effective Softwave therapy is for our patients!

Shockwave Therapy

How Does This Shockwave Therapy in Pawley's Island, SC Work?

Softwave therapy works by using efficient, effective shock waves that cause biological regeneration processes that heal your body using its own healing factors. It works like this: Softwaves are created via a high-energy electrical discharge in water. The voltage is discharged between the plus and minus tips of an electrode. The spark gap or arching causes an equalization of voltage between the opposing tips of the electrode, which causes a hot plasma bubble. This bubble explodes and distributes in every direction, compresses the surrounding water, and generates a pressure > 10 MPa within nanoseconds.

To sum up, Softwave therapy uses low-intensity, unfocused energy that is delivered by a reflector in parallel waves. These waves help open up the blood vessels in your penis, allowing more blood to flow. At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our team of expert physicians will develop a personalized Softwave therapy plan based on your body and needs. With the right number of treatments, you should be able to achieve and maintain firm erections as you did in your prime.

Healthcare Physical Medicine

What Can I Expect During a Softwave Therapy Session at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A Softwave therapy procedure averages 10-15 minutes but may be longer depending on treatment area and diagnosis. A gel is applied to the surface area to be treated. The applicator produces pulses as the clinician moves around the treatment area. During therapy, communication with your provider is necessary to identify treatment areas and monitor progress.

Once treatment is over, you may resume your normal day-to-day activities. In fact, most patients can have Softwave therapy while on their lunch break. You don't have to worry about recovery time, side effects, or any downtime at all.

Ideal Candidate

Who is the Ideal Candidate for Softwave Therapy?

More than 50% of men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. If you're over the age of 30, have been suffering from ED, and don't want to rely on pills or surgery, Softwave therapy may be for you. That's doubly true if you've tried traditional treatments like Viagra and even surgery but didn't get the results you hoped for. Many academic studies about shockwave therapy for ED state that this revolutionary technology is successful where PDE5 inhibitors fail.

In fact, many urologists consider Softwave therapy the most promising ED treatment on the market. The truth is, even if you're not battling ED, men can use Softwave therapy as a preventative way to keep the magic flowing in the bedroom. Some of the key reasons to choose Softwave therapy over less effective, traditional treatments include:

  • No Reliance on Pills and Drugs
  • Softwave Therapy is Backed by Extensive Medical Research and Studies
  • Softwave Therapy Has a Vast Record of Success
  • Softwave Therapy is FDA-Approved for Enhanced Sexual Wellness
  • Now Available at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Q. Has the FDA approved softwave therapy for ED in cityname, state?

A. Yes - Softwave therapy is FDA 510(k) approved for:

  • Improved Blood Supply (low blood flow is the primary cause of ED)
  • Chronic Foot Ulcers from Diabetes
  • Pain Reduction
  • Treatment in 2nd-Degree Burns

Q. Is softwave therapy painful?

A. Softwave therapy does not require surgery or any invasive form of treatment. With that said, some patients describe minimal discomfort or pain during our softwave treatments. Should this occur, your medical specialist will make necessary adjustments. Usually, patients do not have to endure any pain at all and only experience a pulse or tapping feeling on their skin.

Q. How long is a Softwave treatment session?

A. An individual session only takes five to fifteen minutes. It's typically recommended that patients have treatment once a week for three to five weeks. The length and frequency of your Softwave therapy sessions will be determined after you visit our medical clinic for a comprehensive evaluation.

Q. How long does it take for Softwave therapy to work?

A. Every patient we treat is different, and as such, will have different treatment recommendations. Often, patients notice the results of Softwave therapy after the first session. However, for the longest-lasting effects, most patients need between three and four treatments, with a week of non-treatment after every session.

Q. Can I combine Softwave therapy with other treatments from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A. It's hard to give a definitive answer to this question since every patient is different. It's important for you to have a full evaluation to determine the scope of your needs and the appropriate therapies. However, Softwave therapy often works very well with other treatments. In fact, other therapies offered at our medical clinic like massage therapy and chiropractic care can make Softwave treatment even more effective.

Remember - our team at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine is always happy to answer any questions you may have about ED or our ED treatments. Give us a call today - it would be our pleasure to get to know you better!


Contact Us For Services

The Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine Difference

Unlike some wellness clinics, our experienced providers work together to optimize treatment for men suffering from ED. We always strive to make sexual wellbeing an accessible part of your everyday lifestyle.

That's why, at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our mission is simple: to correct the root cause of your erectile dysfunction by taking a comprehensive, total body approach to healing and treatment. We want to address your ED problem without having to resort to chemical-based medications or unnecessary surgeries. Instead, we focus on all-natural, effective solutions like shockwave therapy for ED in Pawley's Island, SC.

By discovering what's best for each person's individual body and needs, we can help create a healthier future for those in our community through our holistic physical medicine practices. Contact our office to learn more about Softwave therapy and how we can solve the underlying causes of your unique ED situation.

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Latest News in Pawley's Island, SC

Jeremiah’s Italian Ice opens in Pawleys Island

PAWLEYS ISALND, S.C. (WBTW) — For the sweet tooth viewers, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held for a new desert shop in Pawleys Island earlier Friday afternoon.Jeremiah’s Italian Ice serves both ice cream and Italian Ice. You also have the option to combine the two to create gelati.The Georgetown County Chamber of Commerce celebrated the grand opening with franchise owner BJ Fisher and his family, as well as employees.Fisher said they offer 24 flavors including sugar free options and seasonal flavors. He told ...

PAWLEYS ISALND, S.C. (WBTW) — For the sweet tooth viewers, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held for a new desert shop in Pawleys Island earlier Friday afternoon.

Jeremiah’s Italian Ice serves both ice cream and Italian Ice. You also have the option to combine the two to create gelati.

The Georgetown County Chamber of Commerce celebrated the grand opening with franchise owner BJ Fisher and his family, as well as employees.

Fisher said they offer 24 flavors including sugar free options and seasonal flavors. He told News13 how excited they are to join the Pawleys Island community as business owners.

BJ Fisher, Jeremiah’s Italian Ice Pawleys Island Franchise Owner said the shop is good for the community.

“We’re trying to make it a great place for everybody to come and enjoy,” he said. “Everybody from youth groups, to schools, after school events, just have this be a great meeting place.”

Fisher said they’ll have their official grand opening this weekend offering half off ice cream and Italian ice from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m.

* * *

Adrianna Lawrence is a multimedia journalist at News13. Adrianna is originally from Virginia Beach, Virginia, and joined the News13 team in June 2023 after graduating from Virginia Commonwealth University in May 2023. Keep up with Adrianna on Instagram, Facebook, and X, formerly Twitter. You can also read more of her work, here.

Local South Carolina coastal town to be featured in upcoming psychological thriller film

Think, “Midsommar.” Or “Shaun of the Dead.” Or, “The Wicker Man.”These are some of the movies that have inspired 21-year-old film director Mathew Epp in a latest film project that takes place in Pawleys Island.Epp, a Charlotte, North Carolina, resident, graduated from University of North Carolina at Charlotte recently and is working on a new project, “Eden Avenue.” Pawl...

Think, “Midsommar.” Or “Shaun of the Dead.” Or, “The Wicker Man.”

These are some of the movies that have inspired 21-year-old film director Mathew Epp in a latest film project that takes place in Pawleys Island.

Epp, a Charlotte, North Carolina, resident, graduated from University of North Carolina at Charlotte recently and is working on a new project, “Eden Avenue.”

Pawleys Island has the perfect small town nature to it, Epp said. He had been visiting a friend — the lead actor — for the past five or six months and decided it was a perfect setting for the film.

“I just realized like the more and more I go down there, you know, it’s a small town,” Epp said. “It’s a local community. And it’s beautiful.”

“Eden Avenue” follows a group of recent college graduates — Michael, Allie, Nick and Brandon, as they decide to take one last vacation together.

The beach town they end up at is inviting at first, Epp said. The town name “Eden Avenue” is supposed to give the area a motherly, inviting feeling.

But there’s a darker side.

The people of Eden Avenue are infected by the algae in the waters. It turns them into a cult-like group of people bent on infecting the protagonists, Epp explained.

It takes on a theme of “group of kids versus everyone else,” he said.

All of this occurs as the protagonists face internal struggles about change. The movie is character driven, and is much more about personal conflicts, such as accepting change than the cult, he said.

With about 20 working on the project, including a crew of 10 and around five to 10 actors, it’s still a while before local residents can see Pawleys Island on the screen.

Epp said that “Eden Avenue” was still in a pre-production stage, but filming is set to begin this month and will take a few days. The crew is still working on getting permits to film in specific areas.

Local viewers can expect to see a recognizable area in Pawleys Island, including the Pawleys Inlet toward the south end of the beach. Epp said he was working with Clam Bake Cove or Oakley as possible settings as well.

He anticipates a spring 2024 release, with “Eden Avenue” distributed on public platforms and then premiering locally in theaters.

The project members are asking for donations to help with production.

And “Eden Avenue” still has some spots left for extras in some scenes, he said.

Those interested can email Fortis Fortuna Films, the production company, at Fortisfortunafilm@gmail.com.

This story was originally published August 11, 2023, 5:00 AM.

Between Ian and Idalia, resilience plans take shape

Georgetown County delayed replacing three walkways at Litchfield Beach destroyed by Hurricane Ian 10 months ago because there was no place for the contractor to stage equipment during the summer tourist season. So those walkways weren’t at risk from the storm surge expected to coincide with king tides as the remnants of Hurricane Idalia swept over South Carolina this week.Other places were keeping a watch on the storm track, the tide chart and the rain gauge.The town of Pawleys Island just replanted sand dunes and replace...

Georgetown County delayed replacing three walkways at Litchfield Beach destroyed by Hurricane Ian 10 months ago because there was no place for the contractor to stage equipment during the summer tourist season. So those walkways weren’t at risk from the storm surge expected to coincide with king tides as the remnants of Hurricane Idalia swept over South Carolina this week.

Other places were keeping a watch on the storm track, the tide chart and the rain gauge.

The town of Pawleys Island just replanted sand dunes and replaced sand fence. It also completed repairs to a stairway in Town Hall that flooded last fall.

The Murrells Inlet-Garden City Fire District just reopened its station at Garden City that was flooded by Ian.

Between Ian and Idalia, both Georgetown County and the town of Pawleys Island have completed resiliency plans required by state law to be part of their comprehensive plans. Both are awaiting final approval. Each takes its cue from the state Office of Resilience, which is defined as “the ability of communities, economies and ecosystems to anticipate, absorb, recover and thrive when presented with environmental change and natural hazards.”

For Pawleys Island, the top goal is to prepare for storm events and flooding. It completed a sea level adaptation plan last year and received $250,000 in the state budget this year to help address flooding.

The town is trying to decide whether to use the funds to complete actual projects, such as installing backflow preventers in pipes that drain stormwater into Pawleys Creek, or to develop designs for larger projects that can help leverage funds for “shovel ready” projects.

“There’s a lot of opportunity,” Mayor Brian Henry said at a recent Town Council meeting.

He favors some combination of the two approaches.

“So many communities have capital improvement plans that end up doing nothing,” Council Member Rocky Holliday said. “I think we have to be cautious.”

Even as Idalia developed in the Gulf of Mexico, the town was warning property owners to prepare for this week’s king tides. To mitigate the impact of “nuisance flooding” caused by rising seas, the town has discussed raising the level of the roads and creating “living shorelines.”

The town’s resilience plan calls for ordinances to encourage “green infrastructure” and regulate the use of hard structures such as bulkheads.

Georgetown County’s plan recommends hiring a resilience coordinator to work with state and federal agencies as well as the municipalities. The coordinator would also lead a working group to help set goals and assess progress.

The plan also recommends the county improve protections for wetlands and trees as ways to reduce flooding and find ways to “guide growth away from high-risk locations.”

“It’s much more robust than what we had originally gotten,” said Pam Martin, a professor at Coastal Carolina University and executive director of the Georgetown RISE sustainable development program. In addition to working on the county plan, she was a member of the advisory council for the resilience plan that the state completed this year.

What the plans need is a common set of benchmarks for measuring progress, Martin said.

“It’s good to have recommendations, but being able to identify indicators by which we can measure our progress and have good conversations around data would make things very clear to the public,” she said. “It would be great if the counties and the state could work together and we all measure the same things.”

And those things don’t have to be complex. They could be as simple as beach walkways.

“That’s a fantastic indicator,” Martin said. They have to be replaced after every major storm. “How much are we spending?”

That’s an area where Pawleys Island can measure progress. After the First Street beach access was destroyed by Hurricane Ian, the town decided to replace it with a $5,500 plastic Mobi-mat rather than a $30,000 wooden walkway.

The mat can be rolled up and moved before a storm. The town hasn’t had to do that, because it only just received a state permit to install the mat. It’s stored under Town Hall.

Another measure would be a stormwater plan like the one Georgetown County adopted last year for the Waccamaw Neck. “How much are we spending? Where are we having flooding?” Martin said.

The county has a $2.9 million federal grant to fund drainage improvements along Highway 17 in Litchfield. County Council awarded an $877,000 contract last week for Woolpert Inc. to engineer and manage the project. It must be completed by December 2025.

Storms like Idalia help focus attention on resiliency.

“We do need events like this,” Martin said. “It reminds us of what people call climate change, an existential threat. It’s a threat now.”

Georgetown County Board of Education: First and third Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m., Beck Education Center. For details, go to gcsd.k12.sc.us. Georgetown County Council: Second and fourth Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m., Council Chambers, 129 Screven St., Georgetown. For details, go to georgetowncountysc.org. Pawleys Island Town Council: Second Mondays, 5 p.m. Town Hall, 323 Myrtle Ave. For details, go to townofpawleysisland.com. , .

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Video of shark swimming on South Carolina shore excites family

PAWLEYS ISLAND, S.C. —A South Carolina family vacationing at the beach this week got up close and personal with a shark on the shore.(Watch video above.)Shanna Nicole Whitaker, of Anderson, was on Pawley's Island with nine members of her husband's extended family at the south point of Litchfield when they saw the surprising sight."When we saw the shark in the surf yesterday (Monday,) we were shocked to see him so close to shore but everyone was really excited," Whitaker said....

PAWLEYS ISLAND, S.C. —

A South Carolina family vacationing at the beach this week got up close and personal with a shark on the shore.

(Watch video above.)

Shanna Nicole Whitaker, of Anderson, was on Pawley's Island with nine members of her husband's extended family at the south point of Litchfield when they saw the surprising sight.

"When we saw the shark in the surf yesterday (Monday,) we were shocked to see him so close to shore but everyone was really excited," Whitaker said.

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Her son Caden, 15, took the video.

She said he "wants to be a videographer, so we can always count on him to have his camera ready."

They estimated the shark was about 4 feet long.

"We did wait awhile before going back into the water, for obvious reasons," she said.

Whitaker said the family also saw several dolphins Monday jumping in the water at the end of the point and found 87 shark teeth along with "lots and lots of really great shells."

Shanna Nicole Whitaker

"We love to flounder gig while walking along the marsh here and have seen lots of stingrays, needle fish, crabs, and jellyfish," Whitaker said.

Flounder gigging is a method of fishing where an angler uses a fish spear, or flounder gig, to stab flounder laying on the bay floor, according to Outrigger Outdoors.

Here's what the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources says about flounder gigging along the state's coast.

Earlier this year, an 8-foot, 395-pound white shark was spotted in the waters of Myrtle Beach.

Keep your cameras handy, and send us video if you see sharks or any other cool creatures along the coast.

Upload your video through the Message button on our Facebook page, or use this link.

‘Bittersweet,’ A Pawleys Island restaurant will be moving at the end of the year

After nearly 20 years in business, a Pawleys Island restaurant will have to find a new home.Austin’s Cabana Cafe and Ocean One will no longer reside in the Oceanfront Litchfield Inn at the end of the year. The eatery’s lease ends December 31 and will not be renewed owner and manager Annette Austin said in an interview with The Sun News.The inn has decided to replace the restaurant with a different one, Austin said. The Inn refused to renew the restaurant’s lease, Austin said in a moment that was “sickeni...

After nearly 20 years in business, a Pawleys Island restaurant will have to find a new home.

Austin’s Cabana Cafe and Ocean One will no longer reside in the Oceanfront Litchfield Inn at the end of the year. The eatery’s lease ends December 31 and will not be renewed owner and manager Annette Austin said in an interview with The Sun News.

The inn has decided to replace the restaurant with a different one, Austin said. The Inn refused to renew the restaurant’s lease, Austin said in a moment that was “sickening”.

The Oceanfront Litchfield Inn could not be immediately reached for comment, and it is unknown what the new restaurant will be. Austin, who also runs a catering business and Austin’s Harvest Restaurant at 1931 Brookgreen Drive in Murrells Inlet, said leaving the Inn is “bittersweet”.

“I wish it wasn’t coming to an end,” Austin added. “But I understand it’s a business decision.”

Despite the move, Austin said customers have shown support for the restaurant and are not happy that it will be moving by the end of the year.

The restaurant will not close though. Austin, who has run seven restaurants in her career with her husband Executive Chef Bill Austin, said she wants to stay on Pawleys Island and is looking at two new locations, although she did not say where.

“We love Pawleys Island,” Austin said. “We’ve literally been driving from home to work in Pawleys almost every day of that 24 years.”

The restaurant, which can currently serve 700 a day, has received an “outpouring of support” from customers, and Austin said people were sad they were moving.

Austin’s Cabana Cafe and Ocean One is two restaurants in one. A patio beach bar experience, Cabana Cafe has dishes such as fish tacos, fried oysters and okra and several seafood dishes and platters.

Ocean One is inside the Litchfield Inn and serves dishes like the Pan Fried Lobster Milanese, a lobster tail encrusted with parmesan served on angel hair pasta with lemon butter and has an extensive list of wines to choose from. Chef Bill Austin graduated from the Culinary Institute of America, one of the best cooking schools in the world.

Austin’s Ocean One is located at 1 Norris Drive on Pawleys Island. Austin’s Ocean One is open Tuesday through Saturday from 5-9 p.m. and reservations are recommended. Cabana Cafe is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and does take reservations.

Editor’s Note: The hours of operation for Austin’s Ocean One and Cabana Cafe were incorrect in a previous version. (Updated: 10:37 a.m. 07/21/2023)

This story was originally published July 18, 2023, 6:00 AM.

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