Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Wando, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
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Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Wando, SC

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Struggling with ED/Erectile Dysfunction that won't improve?

Get your first treatment for ONLY $25

Benefits of Softwave

What are the Benefits of Softwave Therapy for ED?

Unlike some more traditional treatment options, Softwave therapy gets right to the crux of the ED issue. It uses shock wave technology on a cellular level, helping to naturally heal body parts, like the penis. Some of the most common benefits of Softwave therapy include:

  • Increases Blood Supply to Penis
  • Facilitate Stronger Erections
  • Helps Men Maintain Erections
  • Stimulates and Activates Stem Cells in Your Body
  • Remodels and Repairs Tissue
  • Helps Reduce Pain

Additionally, Softwave treatments don't require much prep, don't have any sketchy side effects, don't require any numbing agents or anesthesia, and result in little-to-no recovery time. Sound too good to be true? Contact Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to learn just how effective Softwave therapy is for our patients!

Shockwave Therapy

How Does This Shockwave Therapy in Wando, SC Work?

Softwave therapy works by using efficient, effective shock waves that cause biological regeneration processes that heal your body using its own healing factors. It works like this: Softwaves are created via a high-energy electrical discharge in water. The voltage is discharged between the plus and minus tips of an electrode. The spark gap or arching causes an equalization of voltage between the opposing tips of the electrode, which causes a hot plasma bubble. This bubble explodes and distributes in every direction, compresses the surrounding water, and generates a pressure > 10 MPa within nanoseconds.

To sum up, Softwave therapy uses low-intensity, unfocused energy that is delivered by a reflector in parallel waves. These waves help open up the blood vessels in your penis, allowing more blood to flow. At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our team of expert physicians will develop a personalized Softwave therapy plan based on your body and needs. With the right number of treatments, you should be able to achieve and maintain firm erections as you did in your prime.

Healthcare Physical Medicine

What Can I Expect During a Softwave Therapy Session at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A Softwave therapy procedure averages 10-15 minutes but may be longer depending on treatment area and diagnosis. A gel is applied to the surface area to be treated. The applicator produces pulses as the clinician moves around the treatment area. During therapy, communication with your provider is necessary to identify treatment areas and monitor progress.

Once treatment is over, you may resume your normal day-to-day activities. In fact, most patients can have Softwave therapy while on their lunch break. You don't have to worry about recovery time, side effects, or any downtime at all.

Ideal Candidate

Who is the Ideal Candidate for Softwave Therapy?

More than 50% of men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. If you're over the age of 30, have been suffering from ED, and don't want to rely on pills or surgery, Softwave therapy may be for you. That's doubly true if you've tried traditional treatments like Viagra and even surgery but didn't get the results you hoped for. Many academic studies about shockwave therapy for ED state that this revolutionary technology is successful where PDE5 inhibitors fail.

In fact, many urologists consider Softwave therapy the most promising ED treatment on the market. The truth is, even if you're not battling ED, men can use Softwave therapy as a preventative way to keep the magic flowing in the bedroom. Some of the key reasons to choose Softwave therapy over less effective, traditional treatments include:

  • No Reliance on Pills and Drugs
  • Softwave Therapy is Backed by Extensive Medical Research and Studies
  • Softwave Therapy Has a Vast Record of Success
  • Softwave Therapy is FDA-Approved for Enhanced Sexual Wellness
  • Now Available at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Q. Has the FDA approved softwave therapy for ED in cityname, state?

A. Yes - Softwave therapy is FDA 510(k) approved for:

  • Improved Blood Supply (low blood flow is the primary cause of ED)
  • Chronic Foot Ulcers from Diabetes
  • Pain Reduction
  • Treatment in 2nd-Degree Burns

Q. Is softwave therapy painful?

A. Softwave therapy does not require surgery or any invasive form of treatment. With that said, some patients describe minimal discomfort or pain during our softwave treatments. Should this occur, your medical specialist will make necessary adjustments. Usually, patients do not have to endure any pain at all and only experience a pulse or tapping feeling on their skin.

Q. How long is a Softwave treatment session?

A. An individual session only takes five to fifteen minutes. It's typically recommended that patients have treatment once a week for three to five weeks. The length and frequency of your Softwave therapy sessions will be determined after you visit our medical clinic for a comprehensive evaluation.

Q. How long does it take for Softwave therapy to work?

A. Every patient we treat is different, and as such, will have different treatment recommendations. Often, patients notice the results of Softwave therapy after the first session. However, for the longest-lasting effects, most patients need between three and four treatments, with a week of non-treatment after every session.

Q. Can I combine Softwave therapy with other treatments from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A. It's hard to give a definitive answer to this question since every patient is different. It's important for you to have a full evaluation to determine the scope of your needs and the appropriate therapies. However, Softwave therapy often works very well with other treatments. In fact, other therapies offered at our medical clinic like massage therapy and chiropractic care can make Softwave treatment even more effective.

Remember - our team at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine is always happy to answer any questions you may have about ED or our ED treatments. Give us a call today - it would be our pleasure to get to know you better!


Contact Us For Services

The Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine Difference

Unlike some wellness clinics, our experienced providers work together to optimize treatment for men suffering from ED. We always strive to make sexual wellbeing an accessible part of your everyday lifestyle.

That's why, at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our mission is simple: to correct the root cause of your erectile dysfunction by taking a comprehensive, total body approach to healing and treatment. We want to address your ED problem without having to resort to chemical-based medications or unnecessary surgeries. Instead, we focus on all-natural, effective solutions like shockwave therapy for ED in Wando, SC.

By discovering what's best for each person's individual body and needs, we can help create a healthier future for those in our community through our holistic physical medicine practices. Contact our office to learn more about Softwave therapy and how we can solve the underlying causes of your unique ED situation.

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Latest News in Wando, SC

Leading plan for I-526 and Wando port traffic in Mount Pleasant adjusted after uproar

South Carolina’s initial plan to improve traffic on Interstate 526 and the Long Point Road interchange in Mount Pleasant was met with an outpouring of public opposition, and that’s prompting the state to make revisions.The road work is critical for operations at South Carolina’s busiest port, the Wando Welch Terminal at the end of Long Point Road, and for traffic relief at the busy interchange.The plan calls for new elevated ramps to and from the interstate dedicated to port trucks, and a version presented to ...

South Carolina’s initial plan to improve traffic on Interstate 526 and the Long Point Road interchange in Mount Pleasant was met with an outpouring of public opposition, and that’s prompting the state to make revisions.

The road work is critical for operations at South Carolina’s busiest port, the Wando Welch Terminal at the end of Long Point Road, and for traffic relief at the busy interchange.

The plan calls for new elevated ramps to and from the interstate dedicated to port trucks, and a version presented to the public in 2022 showed that building those ramps could require the demolition of two or three homes in the Tidal Walk subdivision. The subdivision sits along the north side of I-526.

Nearly 540 people submitted comments about those plans in the fall and 59 percent opposed the proposed elevated port ramps, while just half supported the S.C. Department of Transportation’s favored plan known as Alternative 2.

S.C. Department of Transportation Project Manager Joy Riley said the responses showed that people in residential communities north of the interstate were against the proposed elevated ramps and favored keeping port truck traffic on Long Point Road. Unsurprisingly, those living in communities between the highway interchange and the port favored the new ramps, which would remove truck traffic from Long Point Road.

The plans were revised following the survey results, and those changes were outlined at an invitation-only “stakeholders meeting” at the end of November, which included homeowner associations and business owners, plus elected officials and SC Ports representatives.

The revised plans still call for elevated truck ramps, but no longer impact Seacoast Parkway or homes in the Tidal Walk subdivision. Riley said DOT also feels “pretty confident” that an analysis will justify noise walls along the north side of I-526, addressing another concern among residents.

“Noise has always been the number one concern in our neighborhood, along with not wanting any neighbors to lose their houses,” said Grassy Creek resident Lee Lazarus, who has spoken at public meetings about the plans. “Supposedly we’re going to something like a 20-foot wall.”

Under state law, DOT would need Mount Pleasant’s consent for the project. Riley said the town’s approval would likely be sought after another round of public comments following a meeting planned in March, which could prompt more refinements to the plan.

Mayor Will Haynie said the recent revisions addressed the town’s main concerns.

“People were going to lose their homes, and we are very happy that we’re not going to see that,” he said. “Not that there’s no room for improvement — such as turns onto Belle Hall Parkway — but the parts affecting neighborhoods in a major way have been addressed.”

The Belle Hall Parkway issue involves the planned elimination of left turns from Long Point Road to the parkway, where a Waffle House restaurant is located.

That may sound like a small detail, but the parkway is the main entrance to the large subdivision. The elimination of left turns would mean that anyone coming from the interstate would need to drive past the subdivision’s main entrance, then turn on a different road and double back.

Riley said DOT is still looking at alternatives that would allow for left turns there, but so far has not resolved the issue.

The work at I-526 and Long Point Road would be a large road project on its own, but it’s just a small part of the roughly $7 billion Lowcountry Corridor plan to widen the interstate from West Ashley to Mount Pleasant and redesign the interchange of interstates 526 and 26 in North Charleston.

The I-526/Long Point Road project is being addressed in the early years of the larger project partly because traffic has overwhelmed the interchange, and port-related truck traffic regularly backs up on the interstate while trying to exit at Long Point Road.

“It’s a failing interchange because it just cannot process the number of people who are trying to turn left to get to Mount Pleasant, and you have trucks continuously clogging up the interchange as well,” Riley said.

And traffic is expected to increase significantly by 2050.

The next public hearing on the project is tentatively scheduled for March 14, though a time and location have not been announced. The recommended plan, potential impacts on properties, and an analysis of where noise barriers are warranted are among the information that should be presented then.

Until then, “we will be working diligently to assemble the environmental document and move through some critical Federal Highway reviews of our traffic analysis and designs,” Riley said. “All this must be approved before we hold the public hearing in March.”

The leading plan, Alternative 2, would require an estimated 28.5 acres of right of way involving 98 properties, some of which are home to businesses, but no houses. Construction work on the road plan is anticipated in the spring or summer of 2024 and to finish in 2027 or 2028.

Meanwhile, information about the project can be found online at 526lcclongpoint.com, the project team can be emailed at info@526LowcountryCorridor.com, or contacted by regular mail to the attention of Joy Riley, PO Box 191, 955 Park St., Columbia SC 29202-0191.

Mount Pleasant borrowing $50M following park referendum, with tax increase to follow

MOUNT PLEASANT — Town Council has approved borrowing $50 million for a park and recreation initiative that voters narrowly approved in a November referendum, setting those plans in motion ahead of a coming property tax increase.Most of the money, about $40 million, will be used to create a new park complex on more than 120 acres the town bought in 2010 for that purpose on Rifle Range Road just north of Six Mile Road.The rest will improve existing facilities and expand a town bike/pedestrian trail network.The first ...

MOUNT PLEASANT — Town Council has approved borrowing $50 million for a park and recreation initiative that voters narrowly approved in a November referendum, setting those plans in motion ahead of a coming property tax increase.

Most of the money, about $40 million, will be used to create a new park complex on more than 120 acres the town bought in 2010 for that purpose on Rifle Range Road just north of Six Mile Road.

The rest will improve existing facilities and expand a town bike/pedestrian trail network.

The first project the money will fund is renovations of the Park West swimming pool setup.

“That’s fully designed and we are going through permitting,” Director of Recreation Steve Gergick said.

The pool space doesn’t have air conditioning, heat, lockers or family changing rooms. All that will change, Gergick said, and the town will begin the process of choosing a construction company for the work in February.

The Rifle Range Road park plan is expected to relieve pressure on the town’s overwhelmed playing fields and courts while providing new amenities in a central location.

The only hint of the park’s existence now is a small parking lot and a trailhead leading into the woods and wetlands. Plans call for soccer fields, pickleball and tennis courts, a gymnasium, a network of trails, performance pavilion, fishing piers and more.

Becky Williamson, who coached tennis at Wando High School for 12 years before retirement, said it’s been hard to find available courts in recent years.

“People are moving here in droves and many of them play tennis,” she said.

Al Bradshaw-Whittemore, local ambassador for the United States Pickleball Association, is looking forward to the eight pickleball courts planned at the new park.

“It’s exploded, pickleball,” he told Town Council at a Jan. 10 meeting. “Every time I teach I have more and more people.”

Following council’s approval for borrowing $50 million, the town expects to issue bonds Jan. 27. Proposals to the town from architectural and design firms hoping to work on the new park are due the same day.

“We’ll have to go through a full design process and permitting,” Gergick said. “I would expect construction to begin in 2024.”

“It’s going to be a jewel for the town, it really is,” he said.

The town’s park site is adjacent to a Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission property that has not been improved. The combined 245 acres were purchased together in 2010 for $20 million, mostly using county greenbelt money.

Mount Pleasant is an affluent suburb with low property taxes, and the November referendum to raise the tax rate to pay for the park and recreation projects barely passed by a vote of 20,925 to 20,254.

Charleston County dropped plans for a tax-raising referendum to fund affordable housing in 2022, partly because the town’s referendum would be on the ballot in the same election. A majority of Mount Pleasant voters had previously rejected referendums on countywide housing and town parks.

Property owners can expect the town’s portion of their annual tax bill to rise by 10 percent starting with the bills that go out in October. The tax increase is expected to remain in place for 15 years to pay off the debt, which will be more than $50 million with interest.

The impact on tax bills will vary depending on the value of a property and whether it’s residential or commercial. A person with a home valued at $500,000 for tax purposes would pay another $80 yearly, for example.

Two members of the nine-person Town Council had opposed holding the referendum: Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley. On Jan. 10 they joined a unanimous vote to do as voters asked and borrow the $50 million.

Cobras complete epic week of hoops

Cane Bay High School’s girls basketball team wasn’t ranked to start the week but made a bold statement in a pair of Region 6-AAAAA clashes to show maybe it should be in the next Class AAAAA poll.The Cobras highlighted a huge week on the hardwood by edging top-ranked Stratford High School, 43-37, on Jan. 13 at CBHS. Cane Bay (12-6, 2-0 region) knocked off eighth-ranked Wando High School, 59-53, three days earlier.Cobras senior guard Alaina Nettles poured in a game-high 25 points against Stratford, including the last ...

Cane Bay High School’s girls basketball team wasn’t ranked to start the week but made a bold statement in a pair of Region 6-AAAAA clashes to show maybe it should be in the next Class AAAAA poll.

The Cobras highlighted a huge week on the hardwood by edging top-ranked Stratford High School, 43-37, on Jan. 13 at CBHS. Cane Bay (12-6, 2-0 region) knocked off eighth-ranked Wando High School, 59-53, three days earlier.

Cobras senior guard Alaina Nettles poured in a game-high 25 points against Stratford, including the last six for the home team in the final minute. The Cobras held Stratford to 10 points less than its season average.

“Our defense has been pretty good all year,” Cane Bay coach Ira Owens said. “It was just a matter of communicating over all the noise. They had to communicate to identify shooters and cutters and stuff like that. Offensively, when you’ve got somebody like Alaina you tend to just sit back and let her go.”

Senior wing Kimanni White added 12 points for the Cobras, who travel to Goose Creek Jan. 17.

“Seems like every game, we have somebody else step up,” Owens said. “You know Alaina is going to get hers. Tonight it was Kimanni’s night.”

Sophomore guard Ciara Mustapher and senior forward Yasmine Cook led Stratford with 14 and 12 points, respectively. The Knights (13-2, 0-1 region) host Wando Jan. 17.

Cane Bay scored eight of the last nine points to earn the key region victory. Senior forward Samantha Mullen made one of two free throws with over a minute left to break a 36-36 tie and Nettles got a friendly balance on a runner to push the Cobras’ lead to 39-36.

She added four free throws in the final minute, including two with under 20 seconds left for the final margin of victory.

Stratford, which had won eight straight, led by as many as seven points in the first half before Cane Bay scored the last nine points of the second quarter to lead 22-19 at the break.

The Knights scored the first two buckets of the third quarter but their lead was short-lived. White drained a 3-pointer to put the Cobras back on top, 25-23, and Cane Bay led 31-27 going into the final eight minutes.

Nettles made it a six-point lead early in the fourth quarter but the Knights rallied to regain an advantage, 35-33, on a bucket by Kiki Prudhomme midway through the last period.

Nettles answered to tie it, 35-35, and each team hit one free throw as the clock ticked under three minutes remaining. Mullen’s free throw gave Cane Bay the lead for good.

“I don’t know if we played a great first quarter all year long,” Owens said. “Seems like it always takes us six to eight minutes to get into the flow of game. We just stuck to our defense and trusted our ability to rebound.”

The South Carolina Basketball Coaches Association polls should be out Jan. 17.

Wando’s Mikey Rosa helps South Carolina over North Carolina in Shrine Bowl

A solid contingent of Charleston-area high school football players helped guide the South Carolina team to a 17-13 win over North Carolina in the 86th annual Shrine Bowl of the Carolinas, played at Spartanburg High School on Saturday afternoon.Leading the way for the South Carolina team was Wando High linebacker Mikey Rosa, who was named the defensive most valuable player after racking up seven tackles, including three tackles for loss.Berkeley head coach Jerry Brown served as the head coach for the South Carolina team. Brown p...

A solid contingent of Charleston-area high school football players helped guide the South Carolina team to a 17-13 win over North Carolina in the 86th annual Shrine Bowl of the Carolinas, played at Spartanburg High School on Saturday afternoon.

Leading the way for the South Carolina team was Wando High linebacker Mikey Rosa, who was named the defensive most valuable player after racking up seven tackles, including three tackles for loss.

Berkeley head coach Jerry Brown served as the head coach for the South Carolina team. Brown played in the Shrine Bowl in 1967 and was a South Carolina assistant in the 2000 game. He finishes with a 3-0 record in the game.

“It was fun, a great week, and the game was even better,” said Rosa, who plans to sign with The Citadel on Wednesday. “We built a good chemistry during the week and I think that was a main reason we won. One of the things Coach Brown talked about when we got here was about leaving the ego at the door. I think we all did that and came together.”

Rosa was one of four linebackers from the Charleston area to play for the Sandlappers, joining Cameron Avery (Cane Bay), Omari Jenkins (Timberland) and Christian Garland (Ashley Ridge).

Jenkins, one of the team captains for the Sandlappers, finished with five tackles, including 2½ tackles for loss. Avery had four tackles and Garland was credited with two tackles.

Fort Dorchester defensive lineman DeAndre Jones tallied four tackles with a sack and Summerville defensive back Michael Jenkins was credited with one tackle.

On offense, Woodland’s Suderian Harrison, a quarterback during the regular season, played wide receiver in the game and had one 10-yard reception. Summerville running back Marquez Spells had 12 yards rushing on three carries.

South Florence quarterback LaNorris Sellers was named the offensive most valuable player. Sellers, currently a Syracuse commit, completed 9 of 13 passes for 121 yards and rushed for 41 yards. Sellers threw a 55-yard touchdown pass to Clemson commit Tyler Brown of Greenville High.

Another Clemson commit, Dutch Fork running back Jarvis Green, had 58 yards rushing on 15 carries. His 2-yard run with 4:40 left in the game proved to be the game-winning score for the Sandlappers.

South Carolina finished the game with 291 total yards while the defense limited the Tarheels to 182 total yards. The only negative in the win for South Carolina was 15 penalties for 120 yards, including several personal foul flags.

This year’s game marked the first in the series since 2019. The game was cancelled due to COVID issues in 2020 and 2021.

Myrtle Beach area, Georgetown high school football coach and AD hirings coming soon

There are several prominent high school football head coach and athletic director positions open on the Grand Strand, and some of those jobs are looking like they will be filled sooner than others.At Georgetown High, both the football head coach and athletic director positions are open, with the former looking like it’s going to be filled the soonest, the head football coach position is open at both Conway and Green Sea Floyds high schools, and at brand-new Atlantic Collegiate Academy, the school is looking to hire an athletic d...

There are several prominent high school football head coach and athletic director positions open on the Grand Strand, and some of those jobs are looking like they will be filled sooner than others.

At Georgetown High, both the football head coach and athletic director positions are open, with the former looking like it’s going to be filled the soonest, the head football coach position is open at both Conway and Green Sea Floyds high schools, and at brand-new Atlantic Collegiate Academy, the school is looking to hire an athletic director.

For the Georgetown football head coach position, Georgetown County School District’s goal is to have a recommendation for the school board at its meeting on Jan. 17, according to GCSD spokeswoman Kristi Kibler. Six applicants have been considered for the role and finalists have not been named.

This coach will replace Jimmy Noonan, who stepped down from his roles as varsity football head coach and athletic director at Georgetown High on Nov. 5.

Noonan was the head coach of the Bulldogs for the last three years, coming over from Wando High School in 2020. Noonan was 2-25 in his three seasons at Georgetown and 0-19 over the last two seasons. Noonan was also the athletic director at the school for the past three years.

Regarding the Georgetown AD position, Kibler said decisions concerning that job will be made after interviews for head football coach have concluded.

Over in Horry County, Conway High athletic director Anthony Carroll said there are no updates regarding the head football coach opening.

Conway is looking to replace Carlton Terry, who was fired on Nov. 17 after six seasons at the helm.

Terry went 24-34 during his time as head coach of the Tigers, most recently going 4-7 in 2022 and taking Conway to the first round of the AAAAA playoffs, where the Tigers lost to Summerville, 48-0.

Terry’s best season with the Tigers was in 2017, where he led the Tigers to a 10-2 record, a Region 6-AAAAA title and a second round playoff appearance as the interim coach.

The other Horry County Schools football head coach vacancy is the one left by Joey Price, who stepped down as the head man at Green Sea Floyds on Oct. 31. Price finished 1-9 in 2022 with his Trojans team missing the playoffs. Price was 10-15 in three seasons total at Green Sea Floyds.

Attempts by The Post and Courier Myrtle Beach to reach Green Sea Floyds athletic director Derek Martin regarding updates on the coaching search were unsuccessful.

For Atlantic Collegiate Academy, which is a new charter school in Horry County that will begin its first sports season in Fall 2023, principal Mike Lorenz said the school is in the process of hiring an athletic director but did not offer a timeline for the hire.

ACA is the third school under the Pinnacle Charter Academies umbrella, the other two being Legion Collegiate Academy in Rock Hill, S.C., and Oceanside Collegiate Academy in Mount Pleasant, S.C. The school will offer a variety of boys and girls sports in the fall, winter and spring, per ACA’s website.

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