Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Mount Pleasant, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
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Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Mount Pleasant, SC

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Struggling with ED/Erectile Dysfunction that won't improve?

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Benefits of Softwave

What are the Benefits of Softwave Therapy for ED?

Unlike some more traditional treatment options, Softwave therapy gets right to the crux of the ED issue. It uses shock wave technology on a cellular level, helping to naturally heal body parts, like the penis. Some of the most common benefits of Softwave therapy include:

  • Increases Blood Supply to Penis
  • Facilitate Stronger Erections
  • Helps Men Maintain Erections
  • Stimulates and Activates Stem Cells in Your Body
  • Remodels and Repairs Tissue
  • Helps Reduce Pain

Additionally, Softwave treatments don't require much prep, don't have any sketchy side effects, don't require any numbing agents or anesthesia, and result in little-to-no recovery time. Sound too good to be true? Contact Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to learn just how effective Softwave therapy is for our patients!

Shockwave Therapy

How Does This Shockwave Therapy in Mount Pleasant, SC Work?

Softwave therapy works by using efficient, effective shock waves that cause biological regeneration processes that heal your body using its own healing factors. It works like this: Softwaves are created via a high-energy electrical discharge in water. The voltage is discharged between the plus and minus tips of an electrode. The spark gap or arching causes an equalization of voltage between the opposing tips of the electrode, which causes a hot plasma bubble. This bubble explodes and distributes in every direction, compresses the surrounding water, and generates a pressure > 10 MPa within nanoseconds.

To sum up, Softwave therapy uses low-intensity, unfocused energy that is delivered by a reflector in parallel waves. These waves help open up the blood vessels in your penis, allowing more blood to flow. At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our team of expert physicians will develop a personalized Softwave therapy plan based on your body and needs. With the right number of treatments, you should be able to achieve and maintain firm erections as you did in your prime.

Healthcare Physical Medicine

What Can I Expect During a Softwave Therapy Session at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A Softwave therapy procedure averages 10-15 minutes but may be longer depending on treatment area and diagnosis. A gel is applied to the surface area to be treated. The applicator produces pulses as the clinician moves around the treatment area. During therapy, communication with your provider is necessary to identify treatment areas and monitor progress.

Once treatment is over, you may resume your normal day-to-day activities. In fact, most patients can have Softwave therapy while on their lunch break. You don't have to worry about recovery time, side effects, or any downtime at all.

Ideal Candidate

Who is the Ideal Candidate for Softwave Therapy?

More than 50% of men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. If you're over the age of 30, have been suffering from ED, and don't want to rely on pills or surgery, Softwave therapy may be for you. That's doubly true if you've tried traditional treatments like Viagra and even surgery but didn't get the results you hoped for. Many academic studies about shockwave therapy for ED state that this revolutionary technology is successful where PDE5 inhibitors fail.

In fact, many urologists consider Softwave therapy the most promising ED treatment on the market. The truth is, even if you're not battling ED, men can use Softwave therapy as a preventative way to keep the magic flowing in the bedroom. Some of the key reasons to choose Softwave therapy over less effective, traditional treatments include:

  • No Reliance on Pills and Drugs
  • Softwave Therapy is Backed by Extensive Medical Research and Studies
  • Softwave Therapy Has a Vast Record of Success
  • Softwave Therapy is FDA-Approved for Enhanced Sexual Wellness
  • Now Available at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Q. Has the FDA approved softwave therapy for ED in cityname, state?

A. Yes - Softwave therapy is FDA 510(k) approved for:

  • Improved Blood Supply (low blood flow is the primary cause of ED)
  • Chronic Foot Ulcers from Diabetes
  • Pain Reduction
  • Treatment in 2nd-Degree Burns

Q. Is softwave therapy painful?

A. Softwave therapy does not require surgery or any invasive form of treatment. With that said, some patients describe minimal discomfort or pain during our softwave treatments. Should this occur, your medical specialist will make necessary adjustments. Usually, patients do not have to endure any pain at all and only experience a pulse or tapping feeling on their skin.

Q. How long is a Softwave treatment session?

A. An individual session only takes five to fifteen minutes. It's typically recommended that patients have treatment once a week for three to five weeks. The length and frequency of your Softwave therapy sessions will be determined after you visit our medical clinic for a comprehensive evaluation.

Q. How long does it take for Softwave therapy to work?

A. Every patient we treat is different, and as such, will have different treatment recommendations. Often, patients notice the results of Softwave therapy after the first session. However, for the longest-lasting effects, most patients need between three and four treatments, with a week of non-treatment after every session.

Q. Can I combine Softwave therapy with other treatments from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A. It's hard to give a definitive answer to this question since every patient is different. It's important for you to have a full evaluation to determine the scope of your needs and the appropriate therapies. However, Softwave therapy often works very well with other treatments. In fact, other therapies offered at our medical clinic like massage therapy and chiropractic care can make Softwave treatment even more effective.

Remember - our team at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine is always happy to answer any questions you may have about ED or our ED treatments. Give us a call today - it would be our pleasure to get to know you better!


Contact Us For Services

The Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine Difference

Unlike some wellness clinics, our experienced providers work together to optimize treatment for men suffering from ED. We always strive to make sexual wellbeing an accessible part of your everyday lifestyle.

That's why, at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our mission is simple: to correct the root cause of your erectile dysfunction by taking a comprehensive, total body approach to healing and treatment. We want to address your ED problem without having to resort to chemical-based medications or unnecessary surgeries. Instead, we focus on all-natural, effective solutions like shockwave therapy for ED in Mount Pleasant, SC.

By discovering what's best for each person's individual body and needs, we can help create a healthier future for those in our community through our holistic physical medicine practices. Contact our office to learn more about Softwave therapy and how we can solve the underlying causes of your unique ED situation.

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Fireworks are illegal in some Lowcountry areas. Here’s where you can set them off

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Ringing in the new year with the pop, sizzle, and bang of colorful fireworks is a New Year’s Eve tradition — but they technically are not allowed in every Lowcountry municipality.Before you run out and purchase a pack (or more) of fireworks, it’s important to know where you can – and cannot – set them off on New Year’s Eve. ...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Ringing in the new year with the pop, sizzle, and bang of colorful fireworks is a New Year’s Eve tradition — but they technically are not allowed in every Lowcountry municipality.

Before you run out and purchase a pack (or more) of fireworks, it’s important to know where you can – and cannot – set them off on New Year’s Eve.

City of North Charleston – Setting off fireworks is legal year-round from 9:00 a.m. until 11:30 p.m., and on holidays like New Year’s Eve and the 4th of July, you can set them off until 1:00 a.m.

City of Hanahan – Firecrackers are only legal five days of the year in Hanahan: Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, and July 4 from 10:00 a.m. until 10:59 p.m.

City of Goose Creek – You can only shoot fireworks in the city on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, and July 4.

Town of Mount Pleasant – You can set off fireworks the day before and the day after a holiday from 9:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. in Mount Pleasant, in addition to the holiday.

Town of James Island – Fireworks are allowed between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. any day including the 4th of July, but that time runs later on New Year’s Eve.

Town of Summerville – People living in town limits can shoot fireworks any day between 10:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m., and on the 4th of July and New Year’s Eve between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m.

Town of Moncks Corner – Fireworks can be discharged on New Year’s Eve from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 a.m., and on July 4 from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.

Purchasing and setting off fireworks in the City of Charleston and on most of the islands is prohibited. This includes Folly Beach, the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Seabrook Island, West Ashley, and the peninsula. You can use sparklers.

Fireworks are allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. on New Year’s Eve in unincorporated Dorchester County. There are no laws set in unincorporated Charleston County.

If you are unsure, it’s always a safe idea to check with your local government or your Homeowners Association before setting off any fireworks.

Those looking to celebrate the holiday with fireworks are encouraged to be respectful of their neighbors and be reasonable when it comes to the time at which they are igniting fireworks.

Mount Pleasant weighing ban on new slab-built homes in flood zones

The Town of Mount Pleasant is considering a ban on new slab-built single-family homes in flood zones. Also known as “slab-on-grade” or “fill-and-build” construction, the method involves placing homes directly on a concrete slab foundation, which can make those buildings vulnerable to flooding.The practice can also create a domino effect that impacts adjacent homeowners. When trying to ensure new homes reach a certain elevation above sea level, developers often will raise a plot by importing dirt. That practice,...

The Town of Mount Pleasant is considering a ban on new slab-built single-family homes in flood zones. Also known as “slab-on-grade” or “fill-and-build” construction, the method involves placing homes directly on a concrete slab foundation, which can make those buildings vulnerable to flooding.

The practice can also create a domino effect that impacts adjacent homeowners. When trying to ensure new homes reach a certain elevation above sea level, developers often will raise a plot by importing dirt. That practice, multiplied across an entire development, can dramatically shift the hydrology of an area and worsen flooding. Developers often clear-cut trees and other plant life that help capture and control flood water — further complicating an already problematic situation.

Charleston City Council approved an essentially identical ban in April. It was a years-in-the-making policy that involved input from local environmental organizations and developers, according to the Southern Environmental Law Center, one of the ban’s key supporters.

Mount Pleasant’s ban would only bar new slab-built homes in the 100-year floodplain. Those are areas that have a 1 percent probability of flooding in any given year.

The proposed ban would go into effect July 1, six months after Charleston’s takes effect. Katherine Gerling, Mount Pleasant’s floodplain manager, said the proposed timing of the ban was intentional.

“This effective date was chosen to kind of see how the city of Charleston is going to manage their ordinance,” Gerling said at a Dec. 13 meeting of Mount Pleasant’s planning commission, where the proposal was under consideration.

Planning Commission member Adam Ferrara expressed concerns that the ban could make it more difficult to build affordable housing in Mount Pleasant, which has seen rising rents and home costs as a result of a decadeslong population boom. Mount Pleasant’s population has roughly tripled since 1990.

“Just bear in mind, that does kind of go against the narrative of trying to build workforce housing that is single-family,” Ferrara said at the meeting. “That does create a cost burden to builders and to homeowners. I’m not saying that’s right or wrong, I’m just saying that is a result of what we’re doing.”

Despite those concerns, the commission passed the measure unanimously. The ban still needs approval from Mount Pleasant Town Council.

Also at the Dec. 13 meeting, planning commission members voted unanimously in support of a measure extending restrictions on new residential construction in Mount Pleasant. Town leaders enacted that measure in 2019 to curb traffic and strain on local resources in the growing suburbs.

“In response to people that said, ‘We need to have all this development because it’s the only way we’re going to keep real estate reasonable,’ — they are wrong,” commission member Kathy Smith said. “That argument only works when the supply and demand curves are in a state of equilibrium. As long as we are net positive in demand in Mount Pleasant, no matter what we do, prices will go up. You can build until your brains blow out, and the prices will go up.”

The proposed ban would extend the restrictions, which would only permit up to 600 new residences annually, until January 2029. The restrictions also still need approval from the full town council.

Each Friday, the Rising Waters newsletter offers insight into the latest environmental issues impacting the Lowcountry and the rest of the South.

Mount Pleasant plans to limit home building permits until 2029 in effort to slow growth

MOUNT PLEASANT — In an ongoing backlash to years of soaring population growth and traffic complaints, this affluent suburb plans to extend ...

MOUNT PLEASANT — In an ongoing backlash to years of soaring population growth and traffic complaints, this affluent suburb plans to extend strict limits on building permits for another five years.

Just 600 new residences would be permitted yearly in the town of more than 94,000 people, and the actual number would likely be lower.

The yearslong effort to slow residential development by capping building permits is a step no other municipality in South Carolina has taken, but few have experienced growth like Mount Pleasant. The town’s population has roughly doubled since 2000 and tripled since 1990.

“There was concern in the community about our infrastructure being able to keep up with the growth rate, and I don’t think that concern has gone away,” said Councilwoman G.M. Whitley, who put the permit limit extension before Town Council in November.

The measure is scheduled for a Planning Commission hearing Dec. 13, with a final Town Council vote expected in January. The “building permit allocation system” has been in place nearly five years, and instead of expiring in early 2024, it would be extended to 2029.

Mount Pleasant News

It’s among many steps the town has taken to thwart rapid growth. There’s also a moratorium on new apartment construction that’s been in place for seven years, zoning rules have been changed to limit building height and density, and development impact fees were increased dramatically.

In 2018, the year before the permit caps began, the town saw 1,407 new dwelling units — houses, apartments, townhouses and other types of residences. Last year, there were 759.

Graphic: New residential units in Mount Pleasant

Building permit limits that began in early 2019 slowed residential development in Mount Pleasant. The town plans to extend those limits to 2029. NOTE: 2023 data As of novEMBER

The Post and Courier | sOURCE: TOWN OF MOUNT PLEASANT | THE POST AND COURIER

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The permit limits were aimed at slowing the town’s annual growth rate for residences from more than 3 percent to a target of 2.1 percent. The result was a growth rate even lower, marked by a low of 1.29 percent in 2020 when just 520 new residences were built.

Real Estate

Mount Pleasant’s ordinance in 2019 laid out justifications for limiting building permits, and nearly five years later those have not changed.

The ordinance to extend the permit limits uses the same language, which says “the effects of significant growth are apparent and have resulted not only in increased traffic, congestion and noise, but have also burdened the services..” and ”...the town’s road system is barely capable of adequately handling current traffic...”

The permit rules are particularly strict when it comes to higher density multi-family construction, such as apartments and condos. Just 500 new multi-family residences would be allowed over five years, while 2,400 single-family homes could be permitted.

Perhaps surprisingly, despite the limits in place since 2019, hundreds of single-family-home permits went unclaimed.

“Right now we have in excess of 800-900 single-family permits,” said Michele Reed, the town’s planning director.

Real estate professionals said a lack of developable land in Mount Pleasant and the high cost of any land available help explain why hundreds of permits to build houses were not used.

“Mount Pleasant, in a lot of ways, is near build-out,” said Josh Dix, government affairs director for the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors. “There’s not a lot of opportunity for single-family.”

Real Estate

If the town were to annex more properties, that could change. The town is currently in a lawsuit over rules that require property owners to become part of the town in order to get the water and sewer service needed for development.

The suit was filed by owners of a 185-acre tract on the Wando River, known as the Republic tract.

If it were to be developed in the town, Mount Pleasant’s impact fees would apply and permit limits would allow just 25 new homes per developer every six months. If it could be developed as an unincorporated part of Charleston County, town officials have said the county’s zoning would allow about 1,600 homes.

So, Mount Pleasant is mostly built-out, but that could change.

In the current permit-limiting plan that started in 2019, all but 10 of the 500 multi-family permits were claimed, as were all 100 of the permits allowed for accessory dwellings — generally small second homes on the same property as a primary home.

Mount Pleasant News

Unclaimed permits will not roll over into the next proposed 5-year program. And as with the current program, there would be limits on how many single-family permits could be obtained every six months.

Drew Grossklauss, a Mount Pleasant realtor who became president of the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors in November, said he understands the town needs to address growth but the length of the permit limit extension seems unnecessary.

“I would say five years seems like an extreme to do something,” he said.

There are exceptions to the permit caps. The two developments that have ongoing agreements with the town, Carolina Park and Liberty Hill Farm, are exempt, as are developments of affordable housing.

Real Estate

During the last five years, there was one townhouse development, Gregorie Ferry Towns, that qualified for the affordable housing exception — townhomes started at $279,000 — but real estate professionals doubt private developers could create more.

“The cost of land, the cost of construction — all these things add up,” said Dix. He said allowing more permits for multi-family housing could help create more affordable housing.

“There is a lot of talk from realtors that if we build a lot of multi-family housing, Mount Pleasant would be more affordable, but I think that’s not true,” said Whitley. “They will charge what the market will bear.”

Charcuterie concept opens first South Carolina location in Mount Pleasant

Listen to this articleGraze Craze, a new charcuterie concept known for crafting grazing boards and boxes, has opened its first South Carolina location at 3373 South Morgans Point Road in Mount Pleasant.The new storefront is located in the National Crossing shopping center at the main entrance of the Charleston National neighborhood, according to a news release. Graze Craze is a part of Big Flavor Brands, the food service division of Starpoint Brands, a family of companies affiliated with United Franchise Group.At Graze C...

Listen to this article

Graze Craze, a new charcuterie concept known for crafting grazing boards and boxes, has opened its first South Carolina location at 3373 South Morgans Point Road in Mount Pleasant.

The new storefront is located in the National Crossing shopping center at the main entrance of the Charleston National neighborhood, according to a news release. Graze Craze is a part of Big Flavor Brands, the food service division of Starpoint Brands, a family of companies affiliated with United Franchise Group.

At Graze Craze, charcuterie experts, known as grazologists, design arrangements that feature an array of ingredients that are ideal for grazing, like fresh fruits and vegetables, premium meats and cheeses, artisanal sweets, nuts and more, the release stated.

The Mount Pleasant Graze Craze is the only one of its kind in the Charleston area, and the franchise owners behind the new store Keith and Kendra Lovas are thrilled to share something completely new with the community they call home, the release stated.

Related content: Restaurant, entertainment venue opens in downtown Charleston

Related content: Lowes Foods to open Summerville store, close others

“The wonderful people of Mount Pleasant love to gather and celebrate,” said Keith Lovas in the release. “There is no better centerpiece for a special occasion than a Graze Craze charcuterie board — it’s unmatched in quality, beauty and functionality.”

The Lovas enjoy playing a role in their community with Kendra working at a local elementary school and Keith coaching youth sports teams through the Mount Pleasant Recreation Department, according to the release. In addition to serving exceptional grazing boards, the Lovas plan to use their Graze Craze to expand their local involvement and sponsor sports teams, further supporting kids in being active and chasing their dreams. The Lovas are also interested in bolstering regional business development through their involvement with the Mount Pleasant Chamber of Commerce.

Graze Craze charcuterie arrangements incorporate an assortment of flavors, like the popular Gone Grazey board, balanced to provide a bit of everything – a mix of cured meats, premium cheeses, crackers, fresh produce, nuts and more. The Vegegrazian is designed with a medley of fresh fruits and vegetables for anyone embracing a plant-based lifestyle.

The artisan-inspired charcuterie offerings at Graze Craze are available in different size options, from Char-Cutie-Cups and Picnic Boxes for nibbling to sharing-size boards with enough fresh food to feed a large party, the release stated.

HOT PROPERTIES: Retail center sells for $28.5M in Mount Pleasant

Alan Freeman and Jeff Yurfest of The Shopping Center Group represented the buyer, Edens, in the sale of 104,000 square feet and 8.8 acres of retail space at Moultire Plaza on Coleman Boulevard and Simmons Street in Mount Pleasant.GMB LLC sold the property for $28.5 million. Tim Wood and Woody Kapp of Meyer Kapp and Associates represented the seller.Other commercial real estate transactions in the Charleston area include:Jing “Julia” Donovan of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the tenant, Manqin...

Alan Freeman and Jeff Yurfest of The Shopping Center Group represented the buyer, Edens, in the sale of 104,000 square feet and 8.8 acres of retail space at Moultire Plaza on Coleman Boulevard and Simmons Street in Mount Pleasant.

GMB LLC sold the property for $28.5 million. Tim Wood and Woody Kapp of Meyer Kapp and Associates represented the seller.

Other commercial real estate transactions in the Charleston area include:

Jing “Julia” Donovan of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the tenant, Manqing Ye, in the lease of retail space at 1039 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. in Mount Pleasant. Mark J. Tezza of Kennerty, Ratner, Tessa LLC represented the landlord, Caro-Cal Associates LLC.

Hannah Kamba and Brent Case of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the tenant, Dulce Inc., in the lease of 2,404 square feet of retail space at One Nexton Blvd. in Summerville from The Shopping Center Group. Jeff Yurfest represented the landlord.

Robert Pratt of Re/Max Pro Realty represented the landlord, 113 N. Magnolia LLC, in the lease of 1,366 square feet of retail space at 113 N. Magnolia St., Suite A, in Summerville to Sip of the South LLC. Roy Oglesby of Carolina One Real Estate represented the tenant.

NAI Charleston veteran broker Will Sherrod recently facilitated the sale of a 23,755-square-foot former bank branch and additional office space on 3.7 acres of land at 201 N. Spence Ave. in Goldsboro, N.C. The property is located approximately one mile from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base and sits near N. Berkeley Boulevard, which is the main retail corridor serving the Goldsboro market.

Jenna Philipp of Palmetto Commercial Properties LLC represented the landlord, James Island Business Park LLC, in the lease of 15,315 square feet of industrial space at 1750 Signal Point Road to Jenna Mobile Philipp.

Caroline Boyce of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the tenant, Sweet Moon Bakery, in the lease of 1,200 square feet of retail space in Unit 12 at 5131 Dorchester Road in North Charleston. Vitre Ravenel Stephens and Taylor Sekanovich of Harbor Commercial Partners represented the landlord.

Hannah Kamba and Brent Case of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the tenant, Blue Clements Ferry Inc., in the lease of 4,000 square feet of retail space at 834 Foundation St. in Charleston. Fritz Meyer and Eric Meyer of Meyer Kapp & Associates LLC represented the landlord.

Hannah Kamba and Brent Case of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the tenant, Catrinas Nexton Inc., in the lease of 4,567 square feet of retail space at One Nexton Blvd. in Summerville. Jeff Yurfest of The Shopping Center Group represented the landlord.

Todd Garrett, Tradd Varner and Crawford Riddle of Harbor Commercial Partners represented the buyer, 2514 Oscar Johnson Road LLC, in the sale of 4,968 square feet industrial space at 2514 Oscar Johnson Road in North Charleston from the estate of Johnathan Uram for $785,000. Robin Pye of Carolina One Real Estate represented the seller.

Vitré Ravenel Stephens and Taylor Sekanovich of Harbor Commercial Partners represented the landlord, Fifty-Two Associates, in the lease of 2,750 square feet of retail space at 8410 Rivers Ave., Suites B and C, North Charleston, to Mulligan's.

Mark Erickson and Jarred Watts of Colliers represented Geopolymer International LLC in the leasing of 4,000 square feet of industrial space at 200 Varnfield Drive in Summerville.

Hot Properties highlights recently sold or leased commercial properties in the Charleston region. Send in your transactions using our online form.

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