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Spinal Decompression Therapy in McClellanville, SC

Could you imagine going through life every day with near-debilitating, chronic back pain? Back pain is one of the most common ailments in America - it's estimated that 8% of all adults, or 16 million people, suffer from chronic back pain in the U.S. every year. If you've never experienced a back injury or pain, be thankful. Chronic back pain affects every aspect of a person's life, from participating in sports to limitations with everyday activities, like cooking dinner. In fact, many people with chronic back pain can't even make a reliable living and put food on the table. Almost 83 million workdays are lost every year due to choric back pain.

Spinal Decompression Therapy McClellanville, SC

The inability to work and provide isn't just a physical issue - it can become an emotional one too. Many people suffering from chronic back pain also suffer from depression and anxiety. Unfortunately, in the past, chronic back pain sufferers wanting to avoid addictive medications and invasive surgeries had few viable relief options. However, if you're suffering from a chronic back issue like sciatica, a pinched nerve, or a bulging disc, pain relief may be closer than you think.

Modern chiropractic care and, more specifically, a spinal decompression chiropractor in McClellanville, SC, may be the long-term solution you need for chronic back pain.

A common misconception is that chiropractors only adjust your back and neck when, in fact, they treat the whole body with all-natural treatments. Here at Elite Healthcare, our doctors focus on your overall health, not just pain. We want to find and address the underlying causes of your symptoms. If you're unfamiliar with an integrative approach to medicine, this strategy may seem new. Our chiropractic care is less about putting a band-aid on the problem and more about finding a natural, long-term solution to your pain.

Fortunately, our experienced chiropractors provide the best in natural pain relief. Prescription and over-the-counter pain medications mask the symptoms you're experiencing versus getting to the cause of your pain. Pain is often the result of your spine being out of alignment, which leads to nerve issues. Once your spine is back in alignment, the nerves function correctly again.

Because our chiropractic center offers a combination of different therapies and non-surgical treatments, we provide a comprehensive approach to healing. Depending on the extent of your back problems, spinal decompression therapy may be the answer to your chronic pain problems.

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Service Areas

Non-Invasive Treatment for Back Pain

Invasive procedures, like back surgeries, often leave the patient racked with pain, long recovery times, and complications. Sometimes, the surgery doesn't work as intended, leaving the patient responsible for a therapy that didn't work correctly. As a non-invasive treatment, spinal decompression therapy can treat back and neck pain without needles, incisions, or harmful manipulations of the spine.

Back Pain

Long-Term, Significant Pain Relief

Getting back pain relief from surgery is far from guaranteed. However, because spinal decompression targets the underlying causes of your back pain, it's a much more effective long-term treatment. Spinal decompression is not a quick fix. When coupled with positive lifestyle changes like losing weight, you can maximize the pain-relieving benefits of spinal decompression.

Significant Pain

Little-to-No Recovery Time

Surgery of the back and spine requires the patient to be bedridden and uncomfortable for days and even weeks. Recovering from back surgery is no easy feat and often requires strong pain medications to help. Sometimes, back surgeries don't go as planned, causing complications and worse scenarios. Spinal decompression, on the other hand, is very effective and doesn't require much recovery time at all. Once your spinal decompression session is over, you'll probably be able to drive yourself home from our office.

Recovery Time

No Addictive Medications

One of the least talked about issues with back pain medications is that they only treat the pain, not the underlying causes. For many patients, relying on meds to relieve back pain fosters dependency on pain pills. Pain pill addiction is a very serious issue in the U.S., often leading patients down a dark path. With spinal decompression, you won't have to worry about taking pills for pain relief. That's because the root causes of your back pain are addressed, not just the symptoms.

No Addictive Medications

Cost-Conscious Treatment

If you were to look at the cost of surgery and subsequent years of prescription medication, you might be shocked. When compared to spinal decompression, surgery is a much more expensive treatment to consider. You've got to take the cost of surgery into account, but also the fact that you'll be forced to take time off work. By choosing spinal decompression therapy, you're choosing a safe, non-surgical treatment that doesn't require any time off work.

Cost-Conscious Treatment

Natural Healing

Spinal decompression relieves pressure on disrupted discs, causing them to retract back into place. This revolutionary treatment also lets oxygen, fluids, and nutrients re-enter your spinal discs, which provides additional healing.

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Natural Healing

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The Smart Choice for Chiropractor Spinal Decompression in McClellanville, SC

At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, we practice an integrated approach to pain relief and chiropractic care. Our goal is to restore your spine to its proper alignment, which speeds up your recovery time and prevents additional injuries. If chronic back pain has taken over your life, it's time to visit our chiropractic office for a thorough evaluation.

Ask yourself this: Have you been suffering from headaches and sleepless nights due to muscle strain? Is your ability to work and put food on the table compromised due to a pinched nerve? No amount of over-the-counter pain medication can provide a long-term fix for such an issue. Thankfully, our chiropractors have years of experience providing relief to patients just like yourself.

After a comprehensive exam, our doctor will create an individualized treatment plan tailored to your body. That way, we can address the full scope of your symptoms by correcting any root causes of your back pain.

From minor chiropractic adjustments to spinal decompression treatment, we'll find the solution that your back and body need to heal correctly. If you're ready to get back on the road to better health, we're here to help every step of the way. Contact our Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to get started.

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Latest News in McClellanville, SC

Eye on remnants from Siege of Charleston

While the events of what transpired during the 1780 British invasion of the Holy City — commonly known as the Siege of Charleston — have long been etched in stone, archeologists have recently undergone efforts to unearth material remains from the battle that forced U.S. troops to surrender to Gen. Henry Clinton and his soldiers.Attendees at the Feb. 23 Summerville Preservation Society meeting at the Old Town Hall building were treated to a rundown of exploration digs conducted by several members of The Charleston Museum, T...

While the events of what transpired during the 1780 British invasion of the Holy City — commonly known as the Siege of Charleston — have long been etched in stone, archeologists have recently undergone efforts to unearth material remains from the battle that forced U.S. troops to surrender to Gen. Henry Clinton and his soldiers.

Attendees at the Feb. 23 Summerville Preservation Society meeting at the Old Town Hall building were treated to a rundown of exploration digs conducted by several members of The Charleston Museum, The Historic Charleston Foundation and others at the Aiken-Rhett House, Wragg Square and Wragg Mall for artifacts of war and other pieces.

On hand to share those findings was The Charleston Museum’s curator of archeology Martha Zierden, who reported how her colleague and museum director Carl Borick spearheaded a project in recent years to “place the siege on the landscape of Charleston” by examining historic maps, first-hand accounts and terrain features.

Subsequent excavations in 2017 revealed positive evidence that allowed discovery crews to put siege lines on the ground.

“Generally, there were three parallels planned during the siege under General (James) Moncrief. The British opened their first parallel on April 1, roughly 1,000 yards from the American defenses, which would be today Spring Street,” communicated Zierden, a 40-plus-year employee of The Charleston Museum.

“If you get out and look, you could actually still see some of the subtle elevation differences — they still exist.”

Many of these landscape discrepancies were identified by lidar technology. It was noted, in fact, that lidar (i.e. laser imaging, detection and ranging technology) has spared archeology crews the labor of slogging through swamps, as designated planes have used the flyover 3D radar to record topography images.

Summerville Preservation Society members also learned about Zierden initially stumbling upon evidence of the siege via archeological testing of the Aiken-Rhett yard in 1985. Nothing but sterile soil was inside the northwest quadrant, while the southwest quadrant was “deeper and more complicated,” but the southwest quadrant, however, contained building rubble and artifacts of the late 18th century. A 2002 follow-up dig yielded brick on top of sand.

A magnetic radiometry device in a separate geophysical survey of Wragg Square, Wragg Mall and Aiken-Rhett signaled the presence of metal pipes, small ditches and a fence line, but none of these items at the time could definitively confirm that these areas once served as British trenches.

Crews returned to the Aiken-Rhett yard in 2017, as museum personnel and College of Charleston students dug through some challenging brick and brick-based rubble remains to locate 18th and early 19th century ceramics, along with a few buckshot pieces. But no musket balls or major armaments were brought to the surface — much to the chagrin of Borick and company.

“So, we’ve been fortunate that pieces of the siege line are preserved in properties that are protected: the Aiken-Rhett yard and the two city parks,” summarized Zierden, who concluded that the siege undertaking didn’t produce many artifacts overall.

Going forward, the museum will likely call technology into use in lieu of conducting physical digs since the former has proven to be less expensive and not as intrusive, per the McClellanville, South Carolina native.

The City of Charleston itself, she added, probably has liability concerns that may result from street excavations in the event of someone driving their car into a pit.

“Traveling in Charleston, every bit of that part of the city is building and building and building. Over the years, we’ve talked to private developers working up in this area about getting across or even just a peek at their profiles, and nobody’s been very cooperative. Charleston doesn’t have any kind of ordinance to require archeology — they don’t have to do anything.”

McClellanville, South Carolina

McClellanville is a fishing town in South Carolina that has traditionally relied on the sea and coastal marshes for fishing, shrimping, and oystering, which make up a significant percentage of the town's economy. The McClellan family was one of the earliest families to settle here, and the area was originally where local planters went to enjoy the milder seaside breezes. The town has gained notoriety more recently as the site of Hurrica...

McClellanville is a fishing town in South Carolina that has traditionally relied on the sea and coastal marshes for fishing, shrimping, and oystering, which make up a significant percentage of the town's economy. The McClellan family was one of the earliest families to settle here, and the area was originally where local planters went to enjoy the milder seaside breezes. The town has gained notoriety more recently as the site of Hurricane Hugo's 1989 landfall. Hugo, which pounded the South Carolina coastline at the time, was the most damaging storm ever to strike the United States. Even though McClellanville suffered some setbacks in 1989, it has significantly recovered over the past 20 years. Residents of McClellanville enjoy a peaceful, rural lifestyle on the banks of Jeremy Creek.

Geography And Climate Of McClellanville

McClellanville is a fishing town situated in Charleston County in the US State of South Carolina. It is located halfway between Charleston and Myrtle Beach and is just 11 miles east of Awendaw on Highway 17. McClellanville is placed within the Francis Marion National Forest, where a wide area of marshes separates the town from the Atlantic Ocean. Mount Pleasant and Charleston are 30 miles and 40 miles southwest of McClellanville, respectively. Right in the middle of town passes Jeremy Creek, and the town extends south to the Intracoastal Waterway, adjacent to Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. McClellanville covers a total area of 6.11 sq. km, of which 5.80 sq. km is occupied by land, and 0.31 sq. km is covered by water.

According to the Köppen climate classification, McClellanville experiences a humid subtropical climate, with hot, humid summers and extremely cold, snowy, and windy winters. The average yearly temperature is 17.9°C, with July and January recording the highest (27.1°C) and lowest (8.2°C) average temperatures, respectively. On average, McClellanville gets 1351.3mm of precipitation each year, with August reporting the highest number (182.9mm). The snowy period occurs between December and February, with the rainy season lasting the entire year.

History Of McClellanville

The history of McClellanville dates back to around five years before the Civil War when local plantation owners A. J. McClellan and R. T. Morrison started selling off waterfront lots along Jeremy Creek. To the west and south, wealthy plantation owners purchased the property to construct summer homes. The settlement was unnamed for some time. Finally, it was decided that McClellanville be the name of the town in honor of the earliest settlers, the McClellan family. Over time, the community was recognized for cultivating a wide range of food, manufacturing turpentine and tar, harvesting lumber, distilling salt during the Civil War, and, more recently, harvesting its renowned Bulls Bay oysters, clams, and shrimp. The islands, bays, and marshes that makeup McClellanville's shoreline were protected in the late 1930s by the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge. The Francis Marion National Forest was created to manage the nearby forests.

The Population And Economy Of McClellanville

According to the latest US Census, McClellanville has a population of 605 inhabitants with a median age of 42.3. The city's racial makeup is 560 white (non-Hispanic/Latino), 20 African-American or Black, and 6 Hispanic or Latino. The remaining are distributed among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), and some other races. English is spoken by 98.1% of the population. The rest speak Spanish (1.6%) and other foreign languages (0.3%). All of the population in McClellanville are naturalized US citizens. Veterans make up 15.7% of McClellanville's population, of which all are males.

Over the past years, the employment market in McClellanville has grown by 0.7%. The projected rate of job growth over the next ten years is 36.9%, which is greater than the 33.5% US average. The annual median income in McClellanville is $33,313. On the other hand, McClellanville residents' median annual household income is $75,781.

Attractions In McClellanville

Visitors may explore 259,000 acres of magnificent pine forests, bogs, and marshes in four wilderness zones. This preserve houses various fauna, including the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker. Besides wildlife watching, the forest also offers several recreational opportunities, including camping, boating, and several trails which can be used for hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, off-road motorcycling, etc.

This Colonial-era rice plantation has a magnificent Georgian-style home that was constructed between 1730 and 1750 with the proceeds of "Carolina Gold" rice that African slaves grew and gathered. There are guided tours available between 12 pm and 2 pm.

Through educational displays and innovative activities presented at the center throughout the year, one can learn more about the ecosystems of Cape Romain and the distinctive natural history of McClellanville. Check out the viewing area if you want to see the six endangered red wolves that dwell there.

McClellanville has endured countless hurricanes, yet it has managed to keep its beauty and quaintness. Today, it is a self-sufficient community with schools, old churches, lovely residences, a few stores, and docking facilities that speaks about an economy that is now mostly reliant on the sea rather than the land.

Lowcounty Land Trust acquires McClellanville property holding iconic Deerhead Oak

MCCLELLANVILLE — A centuries-old oak tree spanning about 30 feet in circumference at its trunk has become an iconic landmark in McClellanville.Plans are underway to place the property under a conservation easement so the town can own it.The Lowcountry Land Trust acquired the single-acre parcel this fall that holds the Deerhead Oak. Its base sits at the intersection of Pinckney and Oak streets.Funds from the Charleston County Greenbelt Program and the landowner made the arrangement possible.Named for an image...

MCCLELLANVILLE — A centuries-old oak tree spanning about 30 feet in circumference at its trunk has become an iconic landmark in McClellanville.

Plans are underway to place the property under a conservation easement so the town can own it.

The Lowcountry Land Trust acquired the single-acre parcel this fall that holds the Deerhead Oak. Its base sits at the intersection of Pinckney and Oak streets.

Funds from the Charleston County Greenbelt Program and the landowner made the arrangement possible.

Named for an image formed by its branches, this special tree is the subject of artwork, murals and poetry in McClellanville, a news release said. The massive Deerhead Oak is bigger-bellied than the Angel Oak on Johns Island and taller too.

William Peter Beckman, a Confederate soldier who was stationed in McClellanville, opened a store in the tree’s shade at the close of the Civil War, according to reports. The town grew from his door.

The Deerhead Oak never stopped growing, either.

McClellanville Mayor Rutledge B. Leland III said the land has been passed down by members of the Beckman family since they opened the the town’s first store.

The Martin family in McClellanville has owned the property since the 1870s and has welcomed generations of residents and visitors to the tree.

“We are grateful for their (Beckman/Martin family) stewardship of the land and are honored to continue to preserve the park for generations to come,” Leland said in a news release.

In 2007, the Deerhead was named Heritage Tree of the Year by the S.C. Urban and Community Forestry Council for its cultural significance.

East Cooper Land Trust, now merged with Lowcountry Land Trust, started the work with the Martins years ago to conserve the Deerhead Oak property. Its former board chair, Justin Craig, recognizes the land as an area that brings people together and “defines our sense of place.”

“Land holds stories and connects people,” said Lowcountry Land Trust president and CEO Ashley Demosthenes. “Nowhere does that hold truer than a place like the Deer Head Oak.”

The land trust expects to transfer ownership of the property to the town in early 2023.

Chefs, farmers collaborate during SEWE live cooking event

The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition (SEWE) returns Feb. 17-19. During this celebration of the great outdoors, local chefs, farmers and purveyors have a chance to shine on the Fresh on the Menu stage in Marion Square.The South Carolina Department of Agriculture teams up with local food authors Matt and Ted Lee to curate 12 to 18 hours of educational cooking. The live demo features chefs and farmers on stage, followed by a tasting. Local restaurant chefs, catering chefs, private cooks, instructors and more will join “farmers,&rdq...

The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition (SEWE) returns Feb. 17-19. During this celebration of the great outdoors, local chefs, farmers and purveyors have a chance to shine on the Fresh on the Menu stage in Marion Square.

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture teams up with local food authors Matt and Ted Lee to curate 12 to 18 hours of educational cooking. The live demo features chefs and farmers on stage, followed by a tasting. Local restaurant chefs, catering chefs, private cooks, instructors and more will join “farmers,” which encompasses fisherman, crabbers, butchers and others, according to Matt Lee.

“That’s the miracle of this event,” he said. “You’re getting festival quality and stage culinary entertainment, but it’s free.”

This year’s lineup includes an array of talent from across the Lowcountry and the state.

Chef and co-owner of Vern’s Daniel “Dano” Heinze, who was recently nominated for a James Beard Foundation Award, is paired with Jonathan Cox of Lowcountry Fungi to work with king trumpet mushrooms at 1 p.m. Feb. 17.

“We have been working with Jonathan of Lowcountry Fungi since we opened Vern’s,” said Johnsman, who is distantly related to Meggett. “His king trumpet mushrooms have been a staple on our menu since day one and we look forward to being able to display them on stage at SEWE and talk about how they are cultivated and prepared at Vern’s.”

Recently announced 2023 S.C. Chef Ambassador Marcus Shell of 39 Rue de Jean is partnered with Marvin and Jada Ross from Peculiar Pig Farms at 3 p.m. Feb. 17 to showcase pork belly.

“It’s really exciting that we choose chefs based on their reputation, but then their reputation expands,” Ted Lee said. “And their talent expands and their awards expand, even from the time we asked them to the time that they appear on our stage.”

Day two kicks off with Emily Meggett, known as “the Matriarch of Edisto Island,” and Edisto neighbor Greg Johnsman of Marsh Hen Mill preparing a Hoppin John recipe at noon Feb. 18.

“Emily is the matriarch of my island, but she’s part of my family,” Johnsman said. “Over the years, I’ve had the chance to cook with local chefs, but it’s a true honor to do rice and peas with her. It’s just so pure. You just feel the home and the love in what she does because it’s done right.”

Johnsman is also a co-owner of Millers All Day, which will have a food truck in Marion Square with a special SEWE-inspired menu featuring items like duck wings.

City Paper contributing writer Amethyst Ganaway teams up with Tia Clark of Casual Crabbing with Tia during a 3 p.m. crab soup demonstration.

Day three highlights include chef Shaun Brian from James Island’s CudaCo cooking hot pork-fat clams on the half-shell provided by Jeff Massey of Livington’s Bulls Bay Seafood in McClellanville. Local clams have never been featured on the main stage, according to the Lee brothers.

“It’s my first SEWE, and I’m so passionate about it as a chef, hunter, gatherer and waterman,” Brian said about his appearance. “We have some of the best clams in the world. Sorry, Martha’s Vineyard.”

The Lee brothers said they do their best each year to incorporate the entire foodscape of the area, and not just limit the guests to famous fine-dining restaurant chefs.

“I think before our involvement, it was pretty reflexive — just put some Charleston restaurant chefs or hotel chefs up there, get it done and make it more of a lesson,” Lee said.

The Lee brothers joined the event in 2018. “[Ted and I] were like, no, this is a fun entertainment moment with a food takeaway that highlights the close connections between South Carolina products and South Carolina chefs of all kinds.

“We decided to mandate that every chef appear with a farmer on stage, so you get much more exciting stories unfolding,” he added. “Watching chefs cook is attractive and fun, but especially if they’ve got some fun stories to tell. It feels casual and natural, and always more like a team on stage.”

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CCSD considering magnet program for future high school in McClellanville area

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Plans are finally in motion to replace the old Lincoln High School with a brand new school in McClellanville.It's been nearly a decade since Lincoln High closed. At a board meeting Wednesday night, there was finally talk of what a new school would bring the community.Charleston County School District leaders presented a slideshow detailing the future of the new high school and middle school in northern Charleston County.CCSD considering magnet program for future high school in McClellanvil...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Plans are finally in motion to replace the old Lincoln High School with a brand new school in McClellanville.

It's been nearly a decade since Lincoln High closed. At a board meeting Wednesday night, there was finally talk of what a new school would bring the community.

Charleston County School District leaders presented a slideshow detailing the future of the new high school and middle school in northern Charleston County.

CCSD considering magnet program for future high school in McClellanville area. (WCIV)

Since the closure of Lincoln High School, kids are waking up earlier to make the bell at Wando High and returning home late because of the long drive.

The constituent school board said a new school will bring relief to the people living in Awendaw and it will provide help to the schools already reaching capacity.

The district is looking at attendance lines within the area while looking at creating a magnet program.

"I do believe a partial magnet or magnet program of some kind might be within the programming options and given that it's going to have a size of 1,000 students it will probably need to pull in some areas other than just the McClellanville and Awendaw area," said Pamela Jouan-Goldman, Chair of the District 2 Constituent School Board.

Scenarios of possible zoning were shown during the meeting.

The methodology was based off the fiscal year 2022 data.

Parents voiced their concerns of drawing the line further down into Mount Pleasant.

"You do not want to force a family who is living right next door to a school go up the road to another school if at all possible so that's why were looking at the magnet as an opportunity to attract families that want to go there despite any increase in distance then they would have," Chief Operating Officer of CCSD Jeff Borowy said.

The district's goal is to get 500 students in both the middle and high school.

Thomas Colleton, Chair of the District 1 Constituent Board, said the school will need to offer something enticing.

“It is important to this build the school but at the same time let's figure out what were going to be doing inside. The curriculum means a lot," Colleton said.

“I don't know how much it would make sense to drive by Wando High School to get on (Highway) 17 to go up to Awendaw, but it does sound like they are going to have different specific programs at their school. So for example if they have got a great art program and my daughter is really into art, that sounds like a nice option to have," said Jonathan Mars, a parent of students at Carolina Park.

Colleton said it's crucial everyone is transparent throughout this process.

Their next steps will be to develop a blue-ribbon committee to review these options and create a draft to be presented to the constituent boards in October.

"I'm hopeful this blue ribbon commission will ease some of this tension, and let people know going to another school, which would be a state of the art school, why wouldn't you want your child to go there," Colleton said.

The Kaiser Farm Tract property was leased in December of 2021 to the former owner to be used as a hay farm.

The three-year lease agreement is able to be terminated at any time with a 90-day notice.

It's also possible a park and library could be built on the property in the future.

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