Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Charleston, SC | Elite Healthcare P.M.
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Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
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Softwave Therapy for ED/Erectile Dysfunction in Charleston, SC

softwave device

Struggling with ED/Erectile Dysfunction that won't improve?

Get your first treatment for ONLY $49

Benefits of Softwave

What are the Benefits of Softwave Therapy for ED?

Unlike some more traditional treatment options, Softwave therapy gets right to the crux of the ED issue. It uses shock wave technology on a cellular level, helping to naturally heal body parts, like the penis. Some of the most common benefits of Softwave therapy include:

  • Increases Blood Supply to Penis
  • Facilitate Stronger Erections
  • Helps Men Maintain Erections
  • Stimulates and Activates Stem Cells in Your Body
  • Remodels and Repairs Tissue
  • Helps Reduce Pain

Additionally, Softwave treatments don't require much prep, don't have any sketchy side effects, don't require any numbing agents or anesthesia, and result in little-to-no recovery time. Sound too good to be true? Contact Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine today to learn just how effective Softwave therapy is for our patients!

Shockwave Therapy

How Does This Shockwave Therapy in Charleston, SC Work?

Softwave therapy works by using efficient, effective shock waves that cause biological regeneration processes that heal your body using its own healing factors. It works like this: Softwaves are created via a high-energy electrical discharge in water. The voltage is discharged between the plus and minus tips of an electrode. The spark gap or arching causes an equalization of voltage between the opposing tips of the electrode, which causes a hot plasma bubble. This bubble explodes and distributes in every direction, compresses the surrounding water, and generates a pressure > 10 MPa within nanoseconds.

To sum up, Softwave therapy uses low-intensity, unfocused energy that is delivered by a reflector in parallel waves. These waves help open up the blood vessels in your penis, allowing more blood to flow. At Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our team of expert physicians will develop a personalized Softwave therapy plan based on your body and needs. With the right number of treatments, you should be able to achieve and maintain firm erections as you did in your prime.

Healthcare Physical Medicine

What Can I Expect During a Softwave Therapy Session at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A Softwave therapy procedure averages 10-15 minutes but may be longer depending on treatment area and diagnosis. A gel is applied to the surface area to be treated. The applicator produces pulses as the clinician moves around the treatment area. During therapy, communication with your provider is necessary to identify treatment areas and monitor progress.

Once treatment is over, you may resume your normal day-to-day activities. In fact, most patients can have Softwave therapy while on their lunch break. You don't have to worry about recovery time, side effects, or any downtime at all.

Ideal Candidate

Who is the Ideal Candidate for Softwave Therapy?

More than 50% of men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. If you're over the age of 30, have been suffering from ED, and don't want to rely on pills or surgery, Softwave therapy may be for you. That's doubly true if you've tried traditional treatments like Viagra and even surgery but didn't get the results you hoped for. Many academic studies about shockwave therapy for ED state that this revolutionary technology is successful where PDE5 inhibitors fail.

In fact, many urologists consider Softwave therapy the most promising ED treatment on the market. The truth is, even if you're not battling ED, men can use Softwave therapy as a preventative way to keep the magic flowing in the bedroom. Some of the key reasons to choose Softwave therapy over less effective, traditional treatments include:

  • No Reliance on Pills and Drugs
  • Softwave Therapy is Backed by Extensive Medical Research and Studies
  • Softwave Therapy Has a Vast Record of Success
  • Softwave Therapy is FDA-Approved for Enhanced Sexual Wellness
  • Now Available at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine

Q. Has the FDA approved softwave therapy for ED in cityname, state?

A. Yes - Softwave therapy is FDA 510(k) approved for:

  • Improved Blood Supply (low blood flow is the primary cause of ED)
  • Chronic Foot Ulcers from Diabetes
  • Pain Reduction
  • Treatment in 2nd-Degree Burns

Q. Is softwave therapy painful?

A. Softwave therapy does not require surgery or any invasive form of treatment. With that said, some patients describe minimal discomfort or pain during our softwave treatments. Should this occur, your medical specialist will make necessary adjustments. Usually, patients do not have to endure any pain at all and only experience a pulse or tapping feeling on their skin.

Q. How long is a Softwave treatment session?

A. An individual session only takes five to fifteen minutes. It's typically recommended that patients have treatment once a week for three to five weeks. The length and frequency of your Softwave therapy sessions will be determined after you visit our medical clinic for a comprehensive evaluation.

Q. How long does it take for Softwave therapy to work?

A. Every patient we treat is different, and as such, will have different treatment recommendations. Often, patients notice the results of Softwave therapy after the first session. However, for the longest-lasting effects, most patients need between three and four treatments, with a week of non-treatment after every session.

Q. Can I combine Softwave therapy with other treatments from Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine?

A. It's hard to give a definitive answer to this question since every patient is different. It's important for you to have a full evaluation to determine the scope of your needs and the appropriate therapies. However, Softwave therapy often works very well with other treatments. In fact, other therapies offered at our medical clinic like massage therapy and chiropractic care can make Softwave treatment even more effective.

Remember - our team at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine is always happy to answer any questions you may have about ED or our ED treatments. Give us a call today - it would be our pleasure to get to know you better!


Contact Us For Services

The Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine Difference

Unlike some wellness clinics, our experienced providers work together to optimize treatment for men suffering from ED. We always strive to make sexual wellbeing an accessible part of your everyday lifestyle.

That's why, at Elite Healthcare Physical Medicine, our mission is simple: to correct the root cause of your erectile dysfunction by taking a comprehensive, total body approach to healing and treatment. We want to address your ED problem without having to resort to chemical-based medications or unnecessary surgeries. Instead, we focus on all-natural, effective solutions like shockwave therapy for ED in Charleston, SC.

By discovering what's best for each person's individual body and needs, we can help create a healthier future for those in our community through our holistic physical medicine practices. Contact our office to learn more about Softwave therapy and how we can solve the underlying causes of your unique ED situation.

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Latest News in Charleston, SC

Downtown and Mount Pleasant galleries teaming up for rock ‘n’ roll exhibit

MOUNT PLEASANT — Downtown Charleston’s Revealed Gallery has teamed up with Mount Pleasant’s White Gallery for an upcoming rock ‘n’ roll exhibit.Scott Parsons, owner of Revealed Gallery, is one of the two artists being featured in the show, which will include portraits of famed classic rockers across a variety of media. The second participant is one of Parsons’ featured artists and friend Mauricio Sánchez Rengifo, who goes by Masáre.Both will showcase their large-scale works at W...

MOUNT PLEASANT — Downtown Charleston’s Revealed Gallery has teamed up with Mount Pleasant’s White Gallery for an upcoming rock ‘n’ roll exhibit.

Scott Parsons, owner of Revealed Gallery, is one of the two artists being featured in the show, which will include portraits of famed classic rockers across a variety of media. The second participant is one of Parsons’ featured artists and friend Mauricio Sánchez Rengifo, who goes by Masáre.

Both will showcase their large-scale works at White Gallery, 709 Coleman Blvd., for the “TripLineDrop” art show from 7-10 p.m. Aug. 25. There will be food and drink vendors, as well as music by Paul Harris, Graham Whorley and DJ Moldybrain, on-site during the show.

Parsons grew up with a brother eight years older than him who loved comic books. He experienced art from an early age and started to attempt drawing his favorite characters at age 7. In middle school, he gravitated toward graffiti and was hired for his first mural in Washington, D.C., in 1997. He moved to Charleston in 2000 and started doing murals again after a hiatus. In 2010, he transferred from spray can to brush and canvas. He also experiments with acrylic pouring.

“My subject matter isn’t easily defined,” said Parsons. “I paint images that strike me when doing figurative work. ... The pouring paintings I do are experimenting with color and are very organic. I direct the paint to a certain extent, but then it’s kind of out of my control, which is very fun for me and I hope for the viewer as well.”

Parsons said he will be bringing a “whole lot of color” to this show, as well as new pour experimentations. This is the first time he has shown at White Gallery.

Masáre studied and graduated as an architect in Colombia in 2005. He spent six months locked in his studio painting some of the works that will be on display at this exhibit, including portraits of Kurt Cobain, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison and Janis Joplin.

His portraits are created from layered textures on rigid surfaces; he uses glass, fabric, wood, beads, plastic, metal, glitter, paper, petals and more. The materials used often coalesce with the story of his subject matter.

“Any material and medium the concept of who I am painting, life and work, dictates me to use,” he said. “For instance, in the Kurt Cobain paintings, there was a shotgun. Frida Kahlo, nails; Jim Morrison, fire and soot; Amy Winehouse, wine bottles and plastic roses.”

Masáre said he loves optical illusions and rock music. So this themed show was the perfect opportunity for him.

Among featured pieces will be a reimagined “Dark Side of the Moon” cover featured 16 video laser discs; hypodermic needles embedded into one work; and paintings of David Bowie’s ascending black neon star and Gustavo Cerati’s sidereal evolution.

He has been in Charleston since February. Both Parsons and Masáre have been featured muralists at the former D.B.’s Cheesesteaks on Savannah Highway in Avondale, West Ashley. Masáre has another upcoming mural along with eight other artists in Mount Pleasant.

Stormwater tunnel in medical district nears completion

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - An extension of a storm drainage tunnel downtown is nearing completion.Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg gave an update on the Ehrhardt Street Project, Thursday morning. The project is an extension of the larger Spring-Fishburne project. The project is a tunnel that collects water and directs it to the Ashley River.“Just a few months ago, we tied in all of the surface collection systems, so the last piece for this addition will be the surface collection system over on Ehrhardt Street, right in th...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - An extension of a storm drainage tunnel downtown is nearing completion.

Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg gave an update on the Ehrhardt Street Project, Thursday morning. The project is an extension of the larger Spring-Fishburne project. The project is a tunnel that collects water and directs it to the Ashley River.

“Just a few months ago, we tied in all of the surface collection systems, so the last piece for this addition will be the surface collection system over on Ehrhardt Street, right in the midst of the hospital district,” Tecklenburg said.

The tunnel extension was expected to cost $14 million with the other $4 million coming from the city. Tecklenburg touted the existing working portion of the tunnel as preventing flooding in commonly flood-prone areas.

“That water, when it rained heavily last night even last year, you would have had a closure of the Septima Clark Parkway just with what happened last night,” Tecklenburg said. “Guess what? The tunnel is working we didn’t have to close the parkway.”

Tecklenburg said there was one more project to be brought to city council that would add three pumps to the tunnel.

“Water will be in the whole system working and draining this part of Charleston,” he said. “It will be optimized by the final phase, which will add three pumps that will be able to pump in over a million gallons in three minutes time.

Tecklenburg said the plans for the medical district tunnel were shown to Gov. Henry McMaster during a tour of the original tunnel.

“I had the governor, and I had a little map showing that if we just extend this tunnel another few blocks, we can pick up another 35 acres of drainage basin that would serve this important part of our city,” Tecklenburg said.

McMaster was originally scheduled to attend Thursday’s tour but could not come.

South Carolina Chief Resilience Officer Benjamin Duncan said $10 million came from a mitigation grant. Duncan said the project was the highest-scoring project in their benefit-cost analysis.

“This has been the most cooperative and the most well-planned project that we’ve worked on so far even though it’s the largest,” Duncan said. “Our job is to lessen the impact of disasters or hazards to the citizens of South Carolina. This is an extremely important project that needed to happen because of the citizens that are affected in the medical district. You’re talking about workers, the economy.”

City officials have previously said one of the main goals of the project was to make sure ambulances can get to hospitals when it rains.

“That will help with the everyday and not only with our employees but help with patient access and all of the entities in the medical district,” Medical University of South Carolina Executive Vice President of Finance and Operations Rick Anderson said.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Trident United Way launches quarterly grants to target needs in the community

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The local nonprofit Trident United Way is launching its Changemaker Grants program.This initiative aims to provide resources and support to local nonprofits making a difference in the community.The Changemaker Grants program will offer investments to improve and expand an organization’s mission.Trident United Way will award the grants in four cycles before June 30 of next year with a minimum pool of $100,000 dollars per cycle.Each grant cycle will have a specific focus, beginning wi...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The local nonprofit Trident United Way is launching its Changemaker Grants program.

This initiative aims to provide resources and support to local nonprofits making a difference in the community.

The Changemaker Grants program will offer investments to improve and expand an organization’s mission.

Trident United Way will award the grants in four cycles before June 30 of next year with a minimum pool of $100,000 dollars per cycle.

Each grant cycle will have a specific focus, beginning with capacity-building grants.

This focuses on skill building for staff members, diversity and equity initiatives, leadership development, management training and strategic planning.

The total of each grant will vary based on the project and financial request from each chosen agency.

Stacy Stagliano, President of Katie’s Krops, a nonprofit that provides fresh produce to those facing food insecurities, says they will be applying for the change maker grant and shares how the nonprofit benefited from a grant earlier this year.

“This year we received a grant to host Spring Fest, which was a spring festival we held in March, and everybody got to come up to the garden and experience the garden,” Stagliano said. “We did plant giveaways. Seed giveaways. We opened our butterfly house; we gained so many new volunteers and supporters from that event.”

President and CEO of Trident United Way DJ Hampton says it all comes down to the well-being of families in the community.

“Changemaker grants will come out every quarter targeted at community needs, especially those things that are in the way of families getting ahead financially,” Hampton said. “So, the goal is to lift up families, Hampton said. This first grant is targeted at capacity building for nonprofits. What’s in the way of them financially, being able to do more of the good work we know they need to do.”

Applications will be open from Aug. 23 through Sept. 11. For Details on requirements and the application process click here.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Florida-based restaurant chain plans to add 2 Charleston-area locations

You’re seeing The Post and Courier’s weekly real estate newsletter. Receive all the latest transactions and top development, building, and home and commercial sales news to your inbox each Saturday here.A fondue ...

You’re seeing The Post and Courier’s weekly real estate newsletter. Receive all the latest transactions and top development, building, and home and commercial sales news to your inbox each Saturday here.

A fondue restaurant chain plans to expand into the Lowcountry.

Bob Johnston, CEO of The Melting Pot, said the Tampa, Fla.-based company is looking to add two locations in Charleston and Mount Pleasant. He cited the Palmetto State’s strong tourism industry as a key reason for the expansion plan.

The chain already has a presence in Columbia, Greenville and Myrtle Beach. It said it hopes to have 15 locations in South Carolina by 2025.

Liberty Senior Living wants to add more units to its South Bay continuing care facility, but it needs an amendment to a planned development because of Mount Pleasant’s moratorium on new multifamily buildings.

3: Number of new restaurants planning to open in the fall in an expanding Charleston-area shopping center.

65,000: Size of proposed new supermarket in a new retail development beside Freshfields Village between Kiawah and Seabrook islands.

2563: Address on Ashley River Road for a fast-food restaurant that recently turned out the lights.

+ More multifamily: A 110-unit townhome development is in the works for the Point Hope area of Charleston on the Cainhoy peninsula.

+ Doctor’s orders: A medical office building is being proposed in Point Hope.

+ Sliding sales: Charleston-area home sales slipped again in July for the 23rd consecutive month.

A social venue called Ocean Club is being proposed at the site of the former Sand Dunes Club property on Sullivan’s Island.

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SC lawmakers order ports agency to find a way to build its rail yard on time

A meeting this week with legislative panel overseeing the financing of a rail and cargo hub for the Port of Charleston has the State Ports Authority scrambling to adjust the project’s construction schedule.The development, called the Navy Base Intermodal Facility, was supposed to be fully completed by July 2025.Barbara Melvin, the SPA’s president and CEO, told a subcommittee of the S.C. Joint Bond Review Committee on Aug. 16 that a portion of the project won’t be finished until a year later.That didn&rs...

A meeting this week with legislative panel overseeing the financing of a rail and cargo hub for the Port of Charleston has the State Ports Authority scrambling to adjust the project’s construction schedule.

The development, called the Navy Base Intermodal Facility, was supposed to be fully completed by July 2025.

Barbara Melvin, the SPA’s president and CEO, told a subcommittee of the S.C. Joint Bond Review Committee on Aug. 16 that a portion of the project won’t be finished until a year later.

That didn’t sit well with the panel and a key senior staffer, who told Melvin to find a way to get the entire taxpayer-funded project built on time.

“Come back to us and let us know in 30 days or so whether or not you can make that commitment and, if not, give us a fully detailed explanation why you can’t,” said Rick Harmon, the committee’s director of research.

Melvin responded: “Yes sir, I’m happy to take on that challenge.”

Melvin also presented a document showing the cost has increased to $468 million, up from its original estimate of $349 million.

Taxpayers are only on the hook for the $349 million, money the General Assembly set aside from the state budget. The SPA must come up with the rest from its business operations or by borrowing.

The part of the rail yard that’s been delayed is a southern access that freight trains operated by CSX and Norfolk Southern would use to enter a building where cargo containers would be loaded onto and from rail cars. Melvin said the delay is due to “challenges of engaging with the Class 1 railroads on the southern access infrastructure.”

Norfolk Southern and CSX have long had disagreements over how their trains will access the new container transfer site, which has been in the works for more than a decade. The railroad operators did not respond to a request for comment.

Legislators gave the SPA money for the intermodal project because the maritime agency had said the lack of near-dock rail service was putting Charleston at a disadvantage to other Southeast ports, Harmon told Melvin.

“We heard your cry and the General Assembly decided to put taxpayer money ... into this project to keep the port competitive,” Harmon said, adding the money was intended to ensure the rail yard was built in a “reasonable timeframe.”

He said the state is unwilling to wait three more years for the project to be fully completed, citing the risk of inflation, a decline in cargo volume at the port and other economic uncertainties.

“I think that is unacceptable to ask the state to wait until 2026 (and) take on another three years of financial risk,” Harmon said.

“It was never envisioned that it would be ’26 before we opened and had everything fully completed and functional,” added state Sen. Nikki Setzler, chairman of the committee’s fiscal oversight group.

“Taxpayers will be without that money for that period of time,” Setzler said. “It affects economic development in this state.”

Melvin said she would meet with her staff to see if there is a way to get the southern access completed in time for the rest of the rail yard’s July 2025 opening date.

“We will work diligently to execute the (committee’s) request to shave time off the 2026 timeline for completing additional tracks to bring this in line with the July 2025 facility opening,” Melvin said in an Aug. 18 statement to The Post and Courier. “We are working alongside our rail partners to build this state-of-the-art, near-port intermodal yard, which will greatly enhance our state’s competitiveness and speed goods to market for our customers.”

The rail hub was part of a $550 million deal legislators approved to help the SPA pay for projects it otherwise could not afford. The package also included $150 million to create a barge system that would allow the SPA to transport containers by water from the Wando Welch Terminal in Mount Pleasant to the two-year-old Leatherman Terminal on the Cooper River. That project is about $18.5 million under budget, Melvin said.

Another $51 million was earmarked to repay a loan from the S.C. Commerce Department to the state-owned Palmetto Railways, which had planned to build the intermodal yard before turning the project over to the ports authority.

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